Abiding Conviction

Abiding Conviction

A definite conviction of guilt derived from a thorough examination of the whole case. Used commonly to instruct juries on the frame of mind required for guilt proved Beyond a Reasonable Doubt. A settled or fixed conviction.

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'It is our abiding conviction that the chronic anomaly of petrol subsidy as primarily fueled by constant devaluation of the Naira and fluctuation in the international price of crude oil can only be solved permanently by getting our local refineries to work optimally.
A conflict that pits an occupying power against an occupied people, where one side is armed with guns and modern weaponry, the other, only with the abiding conviction in their cause, is by its very nature, a travesty of justice and all norms of international law, Ambassador Lodhi added.
'After all, a 'conflict' that pits an occupying power against an occupied people, where one side is armed with guns and modern weaponry, the other, only with the abiding conviction in their cause, is by its very nature, a travesty of justice and all norms of international law,' she said, adding that it seeks to legitimize the strength of 'might' over the power of 'right'.
"After all, a `conflict' that pits an occupying power against an occupied people, where one side is armed with guns and modern weaponry, the other, only with the abiding conviction in their cause, is by its very nature, a travesty of justice and all norms of international law," she said, adding that it seeks to legitimize the strength of `might` over the power of `right'.
And this deep and abiding conviction is an essential part of being a Pisces.
Citing Supreme Court precedent, one Federal Circuit panel has described the clear and convincing standard as requiring "evidence which produces in the mind of the trier of fact an abiding conviction that the truth of a factual contention is 'highly probable.'" Unfortunately, this and other similar definitions only provide an ambiguous notion of exactly what level of evidence is necessary to evoke this conviction in the mind of a typical juror.
Citing Supreme Court precedent, one Federal Circuit panel has described the clear and convincing standard as requiring "evidence which produces in the mind of the trier of fact an abiding conviction that the truth of a factual contention is Cyhighly probable.'" Unfortunately, this and other similar definitions only provide an ambiguous notion of exactly what level of evidence is necessary to evoke this conviction in the mind of a typical juror.
It gave me a crick in my neck, a lifelong fear of beards, and the abiding conviction that eight and nine-year-old boys know almost nothing.
It gave me a crick in my neck, a lifelong fear of beards, and the abiding conviction that eight- and nine-year-old boys know almost nothing.
In A Place in the Choir: Finding Harmony in a World of Many Voices, Jacobson reveals the source of his seemingly boundless energy: The deep abiding conviction that "All God's children got a place in the choir." Jacobson takes this familiar lyric one step further in asserting that there is room for everyone, without exception, not only in choir but also in life.
"It (reasonable doubt) is that state of the case, which, after the entire comparison and consideration of all the evidence, leaves the minds of jurors in that condition that they cannot say they feel an abiding conviction, to a moral certainty, of the truth of the charge," he said.
Such a doubt must not influence you to disregard an aggravating circumstance if you have an abiding conviction that it exists.