abstention

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abstention

noun  abstemiousness, abstinence from action, avoidance, elusion, evasion, forbearance, holding off, inaction, refrainment
Associated concepts: abstention awaiting the state court's decision, abstention based on deferral, abstention based on state issues, doctrine of abstention
See also: absence, continence, desuetude, temperance

abstention

(US) the staying of a federal case because that court considers the issue can better be dealt with by a state court.

ABSTENTION, French law. This is the tacit renunciation by an heir of a succession Merl. Rep. h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Abstentionism and eternal values can wait until later.
First, abstentionism was weakened by the requirement for legislative support to meet such changes in the economy and society as the need for improved health and safety and improved income support for those not working.
The Mexican electorate has resorted to other means besides abstentionism to show discontent to the establishment.
This class abstentionism hurts the Democrats more than the Republicans.
Baja California has always had a high rate of abstentionism," said Luna.
RSF was formed after the divisive Sinn Fein Ard Fheis in 1986 which saw members agree to abandon the policy of abstentionism and take seats as elected representatives in Dublin and later the Stormont Assembly.
The collection has its origins in the attempts by politically committed academics and commentators to both influence and analyze the course of resistance taken by organised labour in South Africa, in particular the move from militant abstentionism to political engagement within the unfolding of the transition towards democracy and the further integration of South Africa into the world economy.
The dissidents believed that by voting to end abstentionism Sinn Fein had abandoned a core principle of republicanism and would eventually accept partition too.
Second, in both cases, abstentionism among registered voters increased significantly in the presidential "segunda vuelta" or runoff elections (from 31 to 35% in 1985, and from 44 to 55% in 1990-1991).
Still, the rate of abstentionism in the Mexico state election was the highest in the last 25 years and perhaps reflected a sense that the result was predetermined because of Avila's large margin in polls conducted before the election.
Electoral dominance, combined with abstentionism by Catholics, reinforced the economic privilege of Unionists and cemented their political hegemony.
But some columnists believe that the move to allow greater citizen participation in the political process is extremely important to help correct some of the deficiencies of a flawed system that continues to allow manipulation or vote-buying, systemic violation of electoral laws, and an electoral process where high abstentionism allows a winner to claim a mandate.