Ad Hominem

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Ad Hominem

[Latin, To the person.] A term used in debate to denote an argument made personally against an opponent, instead of against the opponent's argument.

References in periodicals archive ?
Ad hominem arguments often elicit ad hominem attacks in response, like this: "Only according to you trashy traitor and rabid anti-Muslim fascist.
The findings of the study reveal the difference between the disputants' and mediators' responses to ad hominem arguments, and this difference can be well illustrated by cases when an ad hominem argument is refuted.
Finally, Denyer's ad hominem arguments are inappropriate.
Where civil rationality calls for the strict exclusion of all personal attacks (even suggesting that the misuse of titles is similar to an ad hominem argument, as both personalize an issue that ought to remain impersonal), argumentation scholars suggest that such argumentative moves can be appropriate, depending on the context and purpose of the dialogue.
Fourth, I will contend that argument in the human sciences, especially the scientific study of race, is both inquiry and deliberation, in Walton's terms, and I will show how the Pioneer Fund's critics are making a nonfallacious ad hominem argument.
Those who have previously picked up Finocchiaro's work on Galileo already will be aware of the special attention he has drawn to the astronomer's use of ad hominem argument.
The ad hominem argument makes use of the audience's values and principles in reaching conclusions.
In the three essays that follow Walton's, students of rhetoric apply his conception of ad hominem argument to other debates in the United States Congress.
The ad hominem argument is not a new phenomenon in American political discourse.
In the above excerpt, Frank appears to be making a direct ad hominem argument from veracity (Ad Hominem Arguments 250).
As the Ad Hominem argument has traditionally been dismissed as a fallacy of logic, so John Randolph of Roanoke (1773--1833), who was perhaps its most prolific practitioner has been generally neglected as an orator.
This paper will demonstrate that Senator Bumpers' bias ad hominem argument was reasonable in the argumentative context in which it took place.