Ad Hominem

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Ad Hominem

[Latin, To the person.] A term used in debate to denote an argument made personally against an opponent, instead of against the opponent's argument.

References in periodicals archive ?
Ad hominem arguments often elicit ad hominem attacks in response, like this: "Only according to you trashy traitor and rabid anti-Muslim fascist."
The findings of the study reveal the difference between the disputants' and mediators' responses to ad hominem arguments, and this difference can be well illustrated by cases when an ad hominem argument is refuted.
569), and [sections] 4 of the paper provides an ad hominem argument against categoricity.
Other major stylistic problems include constant ad hominem argument and signals of disapproval for anyone who even leans to the left of political center.
Brown, a figure in the Common Sense School of Philosophy, advanced an ad hominem argument using Hume's practical confidence in inductive reasoning to ascribe to Hume a belief that such reasoning is able to generate truths.
Ad hominem argument is a staple of ideological argument.
I don't say that to be unkind or to make an ad hominem argument (which is not an argument at all), but merely to demonstrate how easy it is to draw conclusions about people from nonexistent data.
Where civil rationality calls for the strict exclusion of all personal attacks (even suggesting that the misuse of titles is similar to an ad hominem argument, as both personalize an issue that ought to remain impersonal), argumentation scholars suggest that such argumentative moves can be appropriate, depending on the context and purpose of the dialogue.
Johnstone's (1952) central claim was that ad hominem arguments could he legitimate and that scholars needed to develop methods by which a legitimate ad hominem argument could he distinguished from an illegitimate one.
Those who have previously picked up Finocchiaro's work on Galileo already will be aware of the special attention he has drawn to the astronomer's use of ad hominem argument. This is not the ad hominem of undergraduate textbooks, the fallacy which attempts to prejudice an audience by introducing irrelevant criticisms of an opponent.
The ad hominem argument makes use of the audience's values and principles in reaching conclusions.
In the three essays that follow Walton's, students of rhetoric apply his conception of ad hominem argument to other debates in the United States Congress.