administrative law

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administrative law

n. the procedures created by administrative agencies (governmental bodies of the city, county, state or Federal government) involving rules, regulations, applications, licenses, permits, available information, hearings, appeals and decision-making. Federal agency procedures are governed by the Administrative Procedure Act, and many states have adopted similar procedural formats either by law or regulation. It is important to consider two vital factors in dealing with administrative agencies: 1) the rules and regulations are often special for each agency and are not usually found in the statutes but in those regulations; 2) a member of the public must "exhaust his/her administrative remedies" (take every step, including appeals) with the agency and its system before he/she can challenge the administrative ruling with a lawsuit in court. There are exceptions (such as emergency or obvious futility) to exhausting one's remedies, but those are rare. Administrative law can be a technical jungle, and many lawyers make lots of money from knowing how to hack their way through it on behalf of their clients. (See: Administrative Procedure Act, administrative law judge)

administrative law

the body of rules and procedures that organizes government and provides mechanisms for redress of grievances as a result of decisions or actions of government. For lawyers its main practical manifestation is seen in cases of JUDICIAL REVIEW of administrative action.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, French universities offer very few master's courses specializing in comparative administrative law.
A couple of hours devoted to comparative administrative law as part of a broader master's do not equal a specialization but they deserve to be mentioned here.
In Belgium, modules at master's level may include an option dedicated to "comparative public law" or "comparative administrative law," although the module offering changes over the years.
It is a mixed module spanning constitutional and administrative law in the USA, the United Kingdom, France and Germany.
Such limited provision of comparative administrative law modules is, however, only the tip of the iceberg.
In Belgium, as in France, comparative administrative law needs to be put in its wider context of comparative law teaching.

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