administrative law judge


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administrative law judge

n. a professional hearing officer who works for the government to preside over hearings and appeals involving governmental agencies. They are generally experienced in the particular subject matter of the agency involved or of several agencies. Formerly called "hearing officers," they discovered that there was more prestige and higher pay in being called "judge."

References in periodicals archive ?
Nine years ago, Missouri courts said the state could remove administrative law judges through the budget process.
A document sent to WPR by Meteor Timber mentioned the DNR has "the sole discretion to concur with the administrative law judge or reverse the decision if the agency believes there are significant factual or legal errors.
Tom Walston, a retired administrative law judge who sought the chief judge appointment in 2016, said Ginn's experience as a lawyer required a different skill set than those required for a judge.
The findings of the administrative law judge are supported by substantial evidence in the record (see Matter of Kelly v Safir, 96 NY2d 32,38; Matter of Pell v Board of Educ.
But that's not the facts of Robare, and that's not what the administrative law judge is saying; reliance on "facially valid" advice must be in "good faith" based on "full and honest disclosure."
After presiding over a five-day hearing, Administrative Law Judge Susan Biro issued a 125-page opinion on June 5, 2014, ruling in EPA's favor on all counts in its complaint against Chem-Solv, Inc., the operator of a chemical distribution facility located in Roanoke, and Austin Holdings-VA, L.L.C., the facility owner.
By the time disability cases reach an administrative law judge, the claims have been rejected at least once and often twice by workers in state offices.
(10) An Administrative Law Judge may modify any rule upon a finding that no party will be prejudiced and that the ends of justice will be served.
An administrative law judge in April 2012 recommended that the state agency deny the company's application, saying the firm's request for the water was improperly "speculative" in that it had no identified buyers and was not ready to expeditiously use the water.
The F said in the statement that it was appealing the decision of an NTSB Administrative Law Judge to the full National Transportation Safety Board, which has the effect of staying the decision until the Board rules.
Following a hearing, an administrative law judge ruled that: the district manager had negotiated in good faith, the district manager's decision to withhold approval of the plan was not arbitrary and capricious, he bad not abused his discretion in determining that the plan was unsuitable, and the changes to the plan requested by the district manager were suitable.
The administrative law judge issued an order extending key dates in the proceeding by about three months on 12 July 2012 and the initial determination in the matter will now be issued on or before 25 October 2012 and the target date to conclude the ITC investigation has been extended from 28 November 2012 to 25 February 2013.

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