advance directive

(redirected from Advance directives)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to Advance directives: Durable power of attorney

advance directive

a declaration by a person in relation to medical treatment (usually to instruct that it stop) to provide for a situation in which he might himself be unable to comment, e.g. the so-called living will. The US Supreme Court established the right for a person to refuse medical treatment, which in the case of a comatose patient can be difficult to establish. This is an issue that is troubling most legal systems because it raises moral, philosophical and practical questions. In the UK the directive is legally effective because treatment requires consent. It need not be in writing. It cannot, however, compel doctors to cease treatment so as to mercy-kill or provide treatment which they do not consider to be in the best interests of the patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of discussions about advance directives on patients' satisfaction with primary care.
Advance directives are another success story for West Virginia because more West Virginians have completed advance directives than residents of any other state.
It would ensure that the online providers of advance directives to be promoted by Medicare must ensure their documents comply with State laws, including statutes that contain important informed consent safeguards.
Its first significant legislative development was the General Health Act (Act 14/1986, of 25 April 1986), recognising the patient's right to autonomous decision-making-to be informed and to choose among different treatments-as consent [11], but only for the present, without regulating advance directives.
Advance Directive: In New Mexico, the Uniform Health Care Decisions Act (24-7A-1-18 NMSA 1978) is the legal basis for advance directives.
It isn't necessary to hire a lawyer when doing advance directives, though an attorney can be helpful in explaining terms and procedures.
Over 300 parents with children with chronic diseases seen at outpatient clinics were asked about their knowledge of advance directives, their preferences on discussing them, and their child's past and current health status.
Advance directives are given by hospitals to advanced cancer and terminally ill patients to sign, and are a checklist of medical procedures and medication that a patient might want to dispense with, because they are painful, prolong existence without improving the quality of life, or impose a heavy financial burden on the family.
In terms of terminology within the New Zealand context, an advance care plan may be considered an advance directive or may be aligned with other existing advance directives and be legally binding (MOH, 2011).
Australia) explores the incorporation of mental health advance directives into law in relation to contemporary human rights debates and the human rights framework of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Full browser ?