advance directive

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Related to Advanced Directives: Durable power of attorney

advance directive

a declaration by a person in relation to medical treatment (usually to instruct that it stop) to provide for a situation in which he might himself be unable to comment, e.g. the so-called living will. The US Supreme Court established the right for a person to refuse medical treatment, which in the case of a comatose patient can be difficult to establish. This is an issue that is troubling most legal systems because it raises moral, philosophical and practical questions. In the UK the directive is legally effective because treatment requires consent. It need not be in writing. It cannot, however, compel doctors to cease treatment so as to mercy-kill or provide treatment which they do not consider to be in the best interests of the patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
But he knows his journey could have just as easily taken a different direction, which is one reason why Entwistle today encourages others to fill out an advanced directive with loved ones who might be left guessing when stressful end-of-life choices come suddenly.
First, advanced directives were not celebrated by participants for their ability to secure aggressive life support treatment for patients who wanted to live despite their critical illness, but were criticized for their inability to "prevent unwanted aggressive treatments that prolong dying".
(42) See, eg, Stewart, 'Advanced Directives', above n 1, 175-6.
Most people want to protect their rights in health, and the Advanced Directives help in this--yet most people aware of them aren't aware of its components or how it's used.
People who think advanced directives are only for the elderly should think about the proverbial bus, said Ann Jackson, executive director of the Oregon Hospice Association.
Miles, "Advanced Directives to Limit Treatment: The Need for Portability," Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 35, no.
Fallout from the death of Jesica Santillan due to a blood type mix-up continues to plague Duke University Hospital (DUH) after a government inspection found "significant deficiencies" in its dialysis unit and the operation of its advanced directives program.
Only 30 percent of the social workers, for example, were familiar with the requirement that all residents must be contacted to discuss advanced directives and proxy decision-makers.

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