ADR

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ADR

abbreviation for ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The definition of adverse drug reactions as given by WHO is 'any response to a drug which is noxious and unintended and which occurs at doses, normally used for prophylaxis or diagnosis or therapy or disease or for modification of physiological function'.
In summary, authors failed to use the correct term for the unwanted effects as adverse drug reactions, missed one of the important adverse effect and concluded the study findings irrelevant to the text presented in the manuscript.
Implementation and evaluation of adverse drug reaction monitoring system in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Mumbai, India.
Adverse drug reaction teaching in UK undergraduate medical and pharmacy programmes.
Thus, the aim of this study was to describe the Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatient children under 6 years of age in two general pediatrics wards located in Barranquilla, Colombia.
Adverse drug reaction of primary anti-tuberculosis drugs among tuberculosis patients treated in chest clinic.
Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) rank among the top ten causes of mortality in some countries and mechanisms for evaluating and monitoring the safety of medicines are vital components of clinical practice.
Data from EudraVigilance are published in the European database of suspected adverse drug reaction reports.
8) Although much has been published about these reactions in the long-term and acute care settings, little has been known until recently about the types of adverse drug reactions common in the outpatient setting, such as the dental office.
Adverse drug reactions in a department of systemic diseases-oriented internal medicine: prevalence, incidence, direct costs and avoidability.
But one study found that 20% of elderly persons had an adverse drug reaction in the first month after hospitalization, with most of those events caused by a prescription that was new to the patient.