Ambulance Chaser

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Ambulance Chaser

A colloquial phrase that is used derisively for a person who is hired by an attorney to seek out Negligence cases at the scenes of accidents or in hospitals where injured parties are treated, in exchange for a percentage of the damages that will be recovered in the case.

Also used to describe attorneys who, upon learning of a personal injury that might have been caused by the negligence or the wrongful act of another, immediately contact the victim for consent to represent him or her in a lawsuit in exchange for a Contingent Fee, a percentage of the judgment recovered.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
They should exert pressure on lawmakers to seek an enduring solution to ambulance chasing, the lowest form of lawyering.
"There is a real sense of urgency to rectify the problem on ambulance chasing. Thus, to put teeth into the law, parties found in violation of the statute shall be meted a penalty of a fine of not less than P50,000 (Dh3,932) but not more than P100,000 (Dh7,863), or by imprisonment of one year but not more than two years, or both, at the discretion of the court."
Getting smart about your marketing choices will prevent you from doing dumb things like ambulance chasing. Leave that to the newbie agents and the you-knowwhos.
In exchange, the firm gets to print its advert on the back of the appointment cards and put promotional leaflets in waiting rooms, sparking allegations of 'ambulance chasing'.
In the USA there can sometimes be a thin line between legal representation and ambulance chasing.
This is ambulance chasing on another level, and it's hard to live with people of this mentality.
I don't know who deserves to be more vilified: the bottom-feeding leeches who have made ambulance chasing and perverting the law into an art form; their plaintiffs bar brethren, who by doing nothing are silently condoning this behavior; the jurors who deposit their backbone and common sense at the entrance to the jury box; or the judges who hide behind arcane laws while throwing up their hands in despair saying that they are powerless to do otherwise.
It isn't about ambulance chasing. It's about public policy, behavior, and accountability.
The book then moves quickly into the automobile age and concentrates largely on phony personal injury claims and ambulance chasing in New York in the 1920s.
Emory's Connell says the FDA's actions and the legal profession's high-tech ambulance chasing are "costing us not only what we [already] have but the chance for new and better products in the future.
The legal profession is aggressively pursuing cases like this, in a new kind of ambulance chasing.
Trial law, they'll tell you, isn't "ambulance chasing;' it's a noble calling that defends ordinary citizens trampled on by greedy corporations.