human

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human

noun being, body, character, human being, individual, living soul, man, member of the human race, one, particular one, party, person, woman
Associated concepts: human rights law, United NationsDeclaration of Human Rights
See also: bodily, character, person, physical
References in periodicals archive ?
Higham et al., "The Earliest Evidence for Anatomically Modern Humans in Northwestern Europe," Nature 479, no.
This time predates the age of the oldest known anatomically modern human fossils.
When the out-of-Africa migrations of anatomically modern humans are taken into consideration, a window is opened that points towards the emergence and nature of such variations and their attendant diseases.
We can regard the roughly one hundred thousand years between the first appearance of anatomically modern humans and the symbolic breakthrough as a kind of gestation period marking a slow buildup in mental capabilities.
But cave paintings were one of the last bastions that appeared to differentiate anatomically modern humans from Neanderthals, who died out some 35,000 years ago.
In an extensive review of recent Neanderthal research, University of Colorado Boulder researcher Paola Villa and co-author Wil Roebroeks, an archaeologist at Leiden University in the Netherlands, make the case that the available evidence does not support the opinion that Neanderthals were less advanced than anatomically modern humans.
Anatomically modern humans have only been around for the last 200,000 years - so you can see it takes a really long time for intelligent life to develop.
(http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/280/1758/20130168.full) "New insights into differences in brain organization between Neanderthals and anatomically modern humans." Proceedings of the Royal Society B published online 13 March 2013.
For example, he contends that it is key to the survival of anatomically modern humans.
Among the topics are whether the Early Aurignacian in Central Europe represents the initial dispersion of anatomically modern humans in Europe, archaeological and palaeoecological studies of palaeolithic industries before the Last Glacial Maximum between 32,000 and 20,000 ago, whether fishing was an important subsistence activity in the Upper Palaeolithic of Southwest Germany, imprints discovered on palaeolithic ceramics at sites in Lower Austria, and different excavation techniques and their stratigraphic results.
The scientists wrote yesterday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, ``This discontinuity is difficult to reconcile with the hypothesis that both Neanderthals and early anatomically modern humans contributed to the current European gene pool.''
The PaleoMicroBot project aims to contribute to the debate of the demise of the Neanderthals and the arrival of the first Anatomically Modern Humans by using a groundbreaking methodological approach, and doing so, to add a new line of evidence to the study of demographic changes in European Prehistory.