Anciently


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ANCIENTLY, English law. A term for eldership or seniority used in the statute of Ireland, 14 Hen. Vni.

References in classic literature ?
In the case of most of our anciently domesticated animals and plants, I do not think it is possible to come to any definite conclusion, whether they have descended from one or several species.
The civilized nations--Greece, Rome, England--have been sustained by the primitive forests which anciently rotted where they stand.
Granite to the geologist is classic ground: from its widespread limits, and its beautiful and compact texture, few rocks have been more anciently recognised.
This was anciently the town house of the Kemeys-Tynte family.
The idea of a primal confrontation is retained most explicitly in shot seven, where Graham writes of how a stone "carn" (or cairn) on the high Cornish moor "moves / So slowly down to anciently / Remember men looking at men / As uneasily as us" (NCP, 213).
Cotton was not a slave crop in India or in southwest China, where it was grown in bulk anciently. And many whites in the South grew it, too, before the war and after.
This strikes to the heart of how we operate as people, particularly in our kind of South Asian patriarchy, which is almost inextricably muddled with selective religious interpretation and anciently misogynistic cultural practice.
Anciently believed to be 'the mother of all grains', this superfood has risen to global fame in the last few years.
Wu et al., "Large-scale analyses of angiosperm nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat genes reveal three anciently diverged classes with distinct evolutionary patterns," Plant Physiology, vol.
China has been viewed as anciently expansionist authority entering the era of further development.
Ariel focuses a lot on culture as a means of bringing people together and believes that 'veganizing' these cuisines is quite simple, as "Almost all countries began anciently as vegan, because you grew your food and shared with the community." She undertook research about ancient communities and learned a lot from speaking with elders to understand further the history of their respective food cultures.
"If the trait is strongly genetic, then people who identify as trans will share more of their genome, not because they are related in nuclear families but because they are more anciently related," said Lea Davis, leader of the study and an assistant professor of medicine at the Vanderbilt Genetics Institute.