Anglo-Irish Agreement


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Anglo-Irish Agreement

an international treaty concluded in 1985 between the Republic of Ireland and the UK. It recognized the requirement for majority consent within Northern Ireland for any change in its status, established an intergovernmental ministerial conference, serviced by a secretariat, that provided an opportunity for ministers from Ireland and the UK to discuss security, policing, prison policy, law enforcement and extradition, and set up an intergovernmental parliamentary council that permitted members of the British and Irish parliaments to meet to discuss matters of mutual interest. It moved on to such an extent that a GOOD FRIDAY AGREEMENT was reached, intended to establish a power-sharing devolved government in Northern Ireland. Its first meeting failed to comply with the necessary requirements for its continued function and it was suspended. For a time the Northern Ireland government was reactivated with a power-sharing executive in operation in the province. As at the time of writing it had been again suspended but renunciation of the armed struggle by the Irish Republican Army brought high hopes of final resolution.
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PM Margaret Thatcher and Taoiseach Garret FitzGerald signed the Anglo-Irish Agreement at Hillsborough Castle.
Ian Paisley, who founded the party in 1971, was often on our television screens shouting about saving Ulster from sodomy and saying "never, never, never" to the Anglo-Irish agreement.
The aim of Ulster Resistance, set up by a collection of people who went on to be prominent DUP politicians, was to "take direct action as and when required" to end the Anglo-Irish Agreement.
The EPU index captures major events from the past including the Anglo-Irish Agreement, the Belfast Agreement, and the Gulf Wars.
The newly released material continues to chart developments arising from the signing of the Anglo-Irish Agreement back in November 1985.
MARGARET Thatcher believed the Anglo-Irish Agreement gave the Irish government all the glory and none of the problems, papers have revealed.
He opens with Sinn Fein president Gerry Adams' negative assessment of the former prime minister and her Irish policy, before pointing out that the 1985 Anglo-Irish Agreement signed by Thatcher laid "the foundations for the British-Irish governmental management of the Northern Irish 'Troubles' that, arguably, led to the Good Friday Agreement in 1998" (1).
He played a key role in orchestrating the Ulster Work-Work ers' Council Strike which brought Northern Ireland to a standstill in 1974 and was vehemently opposed to the 1985 Anglo-Irish Agreement and accused the British prime minister Margaret Thatcher of a betrayal of unionists after she signed the deal which gave the Irish government an advisory role in Northern Ireland.
Besides providing concise narratives covering key periods such as the civil rights era, the first power sharing experiments of the early 1970s, the Anglo-Irish Agreement and the Good Friday Agreement, the work includes a detailed chronology of events, outline biographies of key people on all sides of the conflict and large list of important sources for further reading.
It was a success rooted in and built on the foundation that Garret FitzGerald himself laid with the Anglo-Irish Agreement back in 1985.
He had resigned five years earlier as a Treasury minister over the signing of the Anglo-Irish Agreement, which gave Dublin a role in Northern Ireland for the first time in more than 60 years.
1985 - Anglo-Irish Agreement introduced giving Dublin some say in Ulster affairs.

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