animal

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animal

noun animans, beast, beast of burden, beast of the field, brute, brute creation, created being, creature, pet, wild being
Associated concepts: animals of a base nature, domestic annmals, wild animal
Foreign phrases: Animalia fera, si facta sint mansueta et ex consuetudine eunt et redeunt, volant et revolant, ut cervi, cygni, etc., eo usque nostra sunt, et ita intelligunnur quamdium habuerunt animum revertendi.Wild aniials, if they are tamed, and are accustomed to leave and return, fly away and fly back, as stags, swans, etc., are connidered to belong to us so long as they have the intention of returning to us.

ANIMAL, property. A name given to every animated being endowed with the power of voluntary motion. In law, it signifies all animals except those of the him, in species.
     2. Animals are distinguished into such as are domitae, and such as are ferae naturae.
     3. It is laid down, that in tame or domestic animals, such as horse, swine, sheep, poultry, and the like, a man may have an absolute property, because they continue perpetually in his possession and occupation, and will not stray from his house and person unless by accident or fraudulent enticement, in either of which cases the owner does not lose his property. 2 Bl. Com. 390; 2 Mod. 319. 1.
     4. But in animals ferae naturae, a man can have no absolute property; they belong to him only while they continue in his keeping or actual possession; for if at any they regain their natural liberty, his property instantly ceases, unless they have animum revertendi, which is only to be known by their usual habit of returning. 2 Bl. Com. 396; 3 Binn. 546; Bro. Ab. Propertie, 37; Com. Dig. Biens, F; 7 Co. 17 b; 1 Ch. Pr. 87; Inst. 2, 1, 15. See also 3 Caines' Rep. 175; Coop. Justin. 457, 458; 7 Johns. Rep. 16; Bro. Ab. Detinue, 44.
     5. The owner of a mischievous animal, known to him to be so, is responsible, when he permits him to go at large, for the damages he may do. 2 Esp. Cas. 482; 4 Campb. 198; 1 Starkie's Cas. 285; 1 Holt, 617; 2 Str.1264; Lord Raym. 110; B. N. P. 77; 1 B. & A. 620; 2 C. M.& R. 496; 5 C.& P. 1; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 187. This principle agrees with the civil law. Domat, Lois Civ. liv. 2, t. 8, s. 2. And any person may justify the killing of such ferocious animals. 9 Johns. 233; 10. Johns. 365; 13 Johns. 312. The owner, of such an animal may be indicted for a common nuisance. 1 Russ. Ch. Cr. Law, 643; Burn's Just., Nuisance, 1.
     6. In Louisiana, the owner of an animal is answerable for the damage he may cause; but if the animal be lost, or has strayed more than a day, he may discharge himself from this responsibility, by abandoning him to the person who has sustained the injury; except where the master turns loose a dangerous or noxious animal; for then he must pay all the harm done, without being allowed to make the abandonment. Civ. Code, art. 2301. See Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
A dramatic rise in atmospheric oxygen levels has long been speculated as the trigger for early animal evolution.
Bronfman Gallery of Early Life--provides a unique natural laboratory for the study of early deep sea communities and early animal evolution.
The model uses an iterative approach to imitate animal evolution by introducing random mutations in the virtual pigeons, making them most sensitive to those volatile compounds that are most effective for navigation.
This event appears to have happened once, as did other milestones in animal evolution such as the organization of cells into tissue layers, says Claus Nielsen, abiologist at the Natural History Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen and the author of the textbook Animal Evolution.
Professor Chris Schofield and his team found that humans share a method of sensing oxygen with the world's simplest known living animal - Trichoplax adhaerens - a discovery, which throws light on how humans sense oxygen and how oxygen levels drove the very earliest stages of animal evolution.
This finding may lead to research into climate-vs-size correlations in other animal groups, such as dinosaurs, and may lead to a better understanding of the relationship between climate change and animal evolution.
The 520-million-year-old imprint of the critter's brain indicates that complex nervous systems evolved fairly early in animal evolution in a common ancestor of insects, centipedes and crustaceans.
The discovery of this kind of advanced reproductive technique among prehistoric fish fossils has important implications for our understanding of animal evolution.
2 was a good candidate for study because it is part of an old gene family that has been conserved throughout animal evolution," Jegla said.
For understanding animal origins, the new paper "is really worthwhile as it stands back and tries to make sense of the whole picture," says James Valentine of the University of California, Berkeley, who studies animal evolution.
This is the first clear evidence that suggests our ability to produce sperm is very ancient, probably originating at the dawn of animal evolution 600 million years ago," said Eugene Xu, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynaecology at Feinberg.