Animal

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ANIMAL, property. A name given to every animated being endowed with the power of voluntary motion. In law, it signifies all animals except those of the him, in species.
     2. Animals are distinguished into such as are domitae, and such as are ferae naturae.
     3. It is laid down, that in tame or domestic animals, such as horse, swine, sheep, poultry, and the like, a man may have an absolute property, because they continue perpetually in his possession and occupation, and will not stray from his house and person unless by accident or fraudulent enticement, in either of which cases the owner does not lose his property. 2 Bl. Com. 390; 2 Mod. 319. 1.
     4. But in animals ferae naturae, a man can have no absolute property; they belong to him only while they continue in his keeping or actual possession; for if at any they regain their natural liberty, his property instantly ceases, unless they have animum revertendi, which is only to be known by their usual habit of returning. 2 Bl. Com. 396; 3 Binn. 546; Bro. Ab. Propertie, 37; Com. Dig. Biens, F; 7 Co. 17 b; 1 Ch. Pr. 87; Inst. 2, 1, 15. See also 3 Caines' Rep. 175; Coop. Justin. 457, 458; 7 Johns. Rep. 16; Bro. Ab. Detinue, 44.
     5. The owner of a mischievous animal, known to him to be so, is responsible, when he permits him to go at large, for the damages he may do. 2 Esp. Cas. 482; 4 Campb. 198; 1 Starkie's Cas. 285; 1 Holt, 617; 2 Str.1264; Lord Raym. 110; B. N. P. 77; 1 B. & A. 620; 2 C. M.& R. 496; 5 C.& P. 1; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 187. This principle agrees with the civil law. Domat, Lois Civ. liv. 2, t. 8, s. 2. And any person may justify the killing of such ferocious animals. 9 Johns. 233; 10. Johns. 365; 13 Johns. 312. The owner, of such an animal may be indicted for a common nuisance. 1 Russ. Ch. Cr. Law, 643; Burn's Just., Nuisance, 1.
     6. In Louisiana, the owner of an animal is answerable for the damage he may cause; but if the animal be lost, or has strayed more than a day, he may discharge himself from this responsibility, by abandoning him to the person who has sustained the injury; except where the master turns loose a dangerous or noxious animal; for then he must pay all the harm done, without being allowed to make the abandonment. Civ. Code, art. 2301. See Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
Las fuentes directas del glosario Agrestia et siluestria animalia (que citare abreviadamente como Agrest.) son dos, el Peri dietis Theodori (= PDiet., en abreviatura) y las Etimologias de Isidoro de Sevilla (11).
* Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo, Norway; ([dagger]) Nortura, Oslo, Norway; and ([double dagger]) Animalia, Oslo, Norway Table.
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I further propose that the extracellular matrix is a deep rooted homology that unites the kingdom Animalia into a monophyletic group of multicellular organisms.
Animalia nov sive species novae testudinum et ranarum quas in intinere per Brasilian annas ...
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Animalia: creatures in print & small sculptures by Anneli Arms.
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* For younger years a fantastic example of a narrative text with imagery is Uno's Garden, by Graeme Base the author of Animalia. This text explores extinction, overpopulation and the balance of nature.
It takes us to the fabled land of Animalia, where all animals live in freedom and without fear.
Copeland quien propuso en 1938 una taxonomia basada en cuatro reinos: Animalia, Plantae, Protista y Monera --que en griego significa <<solitario>>--para incluir a bacterias y cianobacterias; el termino Monera tiene su origen en el nombre Moneres, que Haeckel habia usado como una subdivision de su reino Protista.