Annual Percentage Rate

(redirected from Annual Rates of Return)
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Annual Percentage Rate

The actual cost of borrowing money, expressed in the form of a yearly measure to allow consumers to compare the cost of borrowing money among several lenders.

The Federal Truth-in-Lending Act (15 U.S.C.A. § 1601 et seq. [1968]) mandates the complete disclosure of this rate in addition to other credit terms.

Cross-references

Truth in Lending Act.

References in periodicals archive ?
THG has a successful record of producing high average annual rates of return for its investors.
However, historical annual rates of return are available for the G (government security), F (bond), and C (large cap stock) funds only--since the S (small cap stock) and I (international) funds were added in 2001.
The accumulations in Table 3 assume long-term annual rates of return, which historically have been obtainable in quality growth mutual funds.
Rather than calculating the rate of return based on two endpoints-as is the case in simple compounding formulas-and then imputing, say, particular annual rates of return within the period, the repeat-sales regression generates a unique estimate for each period.
3) The estimated annual rates of return for schooling are -0.30 percent for high school, 6.68 percent for vocational school, 5.66 percent for junior college, and 12.26 percent for university.
They have, by and large, been successful--with some reporting annual rates of return in excess of 25 percent to 35 percent in recent years.
Although there have been short-run "booms" in the industry as a whole for example, in 1961, 1967-1969, 1972, 1980, and 1983 in which venture capital funds realized returns of approximately 30 percent or more, the overall annual rates of return over the past 20 years have been less than 20 percent.
Annual rates of return for forest assets are calculated from rates of change ([R [bar].sub.s]) in annual-average stumpage price ([P [bar].sub.s]): [4] [Mathematical Expression Omitted] As illustrated in the figure, [R [bar].sub.s,t and t+1] measures an average annual rate of return during the two calendar years t and t + 1.
I, MacAllister Booth, president and CEO of the Polaroid Corp., cautioned that the 30 to 45 percent annual rates of return called for in many leveraged buyouts will hurt corporate R&D and slowly kill American industry in its competition with foreign firms.
What has attracted this money are not tax breaks, but average annual rates of return of 25 percent or better.

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