Antarctic Treaty of 1959

Antarctic Treaty of 1959

According to this treaty, Dec. 1, 1959, 12 U.S. T. 794, 402 U.N.T.S. 71. Antarctica—the land adjacent to the South Pole—is considered "international" territory, like that of the high seas; it is not under the jurisdiction of any single nation. Its legal status, therefore, is governed by International Law.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alexander Ponomarev celebrates the inhospitable continent which, since the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 has been protected as a site of transnational scientific research --a unique sort of geographical and cultural blank slate.
The United States and Russia were architects of the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 and today conduct some of the most extensive and diverse scientific activities in Antarctica.
"The inspection will be conducted pursuant to the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 and its Environmental Protocol.
In fact, the Antarctic Treaty System, grown out of the Antarctic Treaty of 1959, has been able to protect the Antarctic region in the past.
The Antarctic Treaty of 1959 does not recognize any land claims to Antarctica.
The Antarctic Treaty of 1959 governs international behavior in Antarctica in the presence of overlapping territorial claims.