approach


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approach

v. short for "approach the bench," as in "may I approach, your honor," or "will counsel approach?" (See: approach the bench)

References in classic literature ?
"But to approach it," said the commander, "I ought to put a whaler at your disposal?"
To the very gate he came and when he found it and that it was open he paused for a moment, listening; then he approached and looked within.
Just then a figure was seen to approach the edge of the rampart, where it stood, apparently contemplating in its turn the distant tents of the French encampment.
Natty gave Elizabeth one of his significant laughs, with a kind nod of the head, when he concluded his invitation but Mohegan, with the native grace of an Indian, approached, and taking her soft white hand into his own swarthy and wrinkled palm, said:
Hunting for food was the life labor of the jungle bred, and a life labor is a thing not to be approached with levity nor prosecuted lightly.
The next staircase is approached by a ladder, and ends at the fourth story from the ground.
While thus seated near the threshold, an urchin of the family approached the door, but catching a sight of the strange guest, ran off screaming with terror and ensconced himself behind the long straw at the back of the hut.
Antelopes were likewise seen, but too shy and fleet to be approached. A few beavers were taken every night, and salmon trout of a small size, so that the camp had principally to subsist upon dried buffalo meat.
If he came too close to a she with a young baby, the former would bare her great fighting fangs and growl ominously, and occasionally a truculent young bull would snarl a warning if Tarzan approached while the former was eating.
"My emotions overpower me!" Mercy approached him with the candle.
Country in which there are precipitous cliffs with torrents running between, deep natural hollows, confined places, tangled thickets, quagmires and crevasses, should be left with all possible speed and not approached.
"You will all agree," said he, "that our chief danger consists in the sly and treacherous manner in which the enemy approaches us.