archon

(redirected from Archons)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

archon

(in ancient Athens) one of the nine chief magistrates.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A utopian depiction of what used to be, the way those archons wanted to view the past, its geography, its nature, its history--a past that must embody three essential conditions in order to maintain its utopian character.
This is the second international conference that the Archons are organizing on freedom of religion.
In recent years, the church has come up with a form of acknowledgment of controversial businessmen: awarding them with the title Archon, a hitherto unknown practice in the country.
Armanios is careful not to dismiss entirely the roles of patriarchs and bishops, and she demonstrates particularly well in a chapter on eighteenth-century Coptic pilgrimages to Jerusalem the frequently interdependent rather than entirely competitive nature of the relationships between lay archons and upper clergy.
Sackett said that "Archons," like other Star Trek storylines, warns how people can be controlled by religion.
He looks at the mythology regarding the serpent, the creator and the archons, Adam and Christ, and the Pillars of Seth.
More than 3,000 archons (members) and archousai (wives) attended the Grand Boule Centennial Celebration, the largest gathering in the history of the fraternity, which is oftentimes called the Boule, meaning, in fraternity parlance, "a council of noblemen."
WALTON, Clarence C., Archons and Acolytes: The New Power Elites.
(b) In Aristotle's phrase that the archons nun proanakrinein (3.5), "the combination of pro-- and nun brings to mind a theme which is developed especially in the description of the contemporary constitution, a theme which is usually signalled by the contrast of proteron (formerly) and nun....
The name was also applied to a council of former archons, who assembled there.
I, for example, wondered why the Gospel of Thomas and the Gospel of Philip were the chosen representatives of gnostic literature while two other important Nag Hammadi texts, the Apocryphon of John and the Hypostasis of the Archons, were omitted.