Areopagite


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Areopagite

a member of the AREOPAGUS.

AREOPAGITE. A senator, or a judge of the Areopagus. Solon first established the Areopagites; although some say, they were established in the time of Cecrops, (Anno Mundi, 2553,) the year that Aaron, the brother of Moses, died; that Draco abolished the order, and Solon reestablished it. Demosthenes, in his harangue against Aristocrates, before the Areopagus, speaks of the founders of that tribunal as unknown. See Acts of the Apostles, xviii. 34.

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Riordan, Divine Light: The Theology of Denys the Areopagite (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2008), 130.
So the preposition could mean either 'up (to)' or 'up before', and it is commonly assumed that at 17.19 the Areopagus refers to the Council of Areopagites, (18) and, if this was the case, Paul would have been taken off to what was now their normal meeting place, the Stoa Basileios just off the main agora, (19) and indeed private citizens could traditionally initiate an action before the Areopagus council.
Dionysios the Areopagite suggested approaching the mystery of God "through gnoseos kai agnosias." (8) According to the mystical theology of the Eastern Church, the meeting of God is in the spiritual life and experience.
"Toward a Bibliography of Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, 1900-1955." the Modern School Man 33/4 (1956): 257-268.
Lefevres edition of Dionysius the Areopagite, Dionysii Areopagitae opera omnia: Theologia vivificans.
In this case it takes the form of a breviary that begins with early Christian cosmology of fifth century Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, who was the first, as Schrott puts it, to "order the eternal darkness of the universe with angels" and follows the Biblical mutations of the angel from Babylon to
Thomas' great forerunner, (Pseudo-) Dionysius the Areopagite, puts it in this way:
The light seen in contemplative vision is described in the mystical theology of one of the most important theological sources for the contemplative tradition: the sixth century Syrian monk, Dionysius the Areopagite. As described by Dionysius, the light is greatly different from the use, metaphorical or physical, of light familiar to most moderns--either the inner light that eliminates doubt and makes for clear decisions, or the light of an examination that brings hidden things out of the threatening dark into the secure, but in both cases a light that reveals.
Saints Alive, informed by Williams' knowledge and experience of the Middle Ages and Catholic tradition, notes the paradox of words as "both revered and suspect"; he cites Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite to identify distrust of verbal language and question its implied place above image and gesture in Western culture (21).
This area within the Four Seas counts for little when compared with "what is beyond the unsurpassed light"--an expression that might bring to mind for us the Areopagite's paradoxical divine brightness that seems to veil itself in dark.
WEBER, <<Introducion>>, en Albert le Grand, Commentaire de la <<Theologie Mystique>> de Denys le Areopagite suivi de celui des Epitres I-V, Paris, Les Editions du Cerf, 1993, p.