Areopagus


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Areopagus

the hill to the northwest of the Acropolis in Athens; in ancient Athens, the judicial council whose members (Areopagites) met on this hill. As a result it may be encountered as a term for any high court.

AREOPAGUS. A tribunal established in ancient Athens, bore this name. It is variously represented; some considered as having been a model of justice and perfection, while others look upon it as an aristocratic court, which had a very extended jurisdiction over all crimes and offences, and which exercised an absolute power. See Acts 17, 19 and 22.

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This hinges on what is meant by the action of the Stoics and Epicureans in taking Paul from the agora (14) to the Areopagus to explain himself, as he was apparently promoting the cult of strange gods (Acts 17.
4) Draco's law makes no mention of the Areopagus, but according to the Athenian constitution, attributed to Aristotle, the council of the Areopagus was responsible for trying murders of Athenian citizens.
They sell their ideological wares in the agora and on the Areopagus, just like everyone else--including theologians.
Specifically, Potter points to the passage from Acts in which Paul, preaching in Athens, is brought before the Areopagus "to give an Account of his new Doctrine.
The play takes place in the mythical heroic past before the establishment of the court of the Areopagus in which homicides could be tried.
Some at the Areopagus were offended by the idea of resurrection.
Paul's speech at the Areopagus states that "God has overlooked the times of ignorance" (Acts 17:30).
The theme of this conference was "New Life in Jesus in the Areopagus of a Globalized World," which expresses the concern to understand the complex context of mission in order to communicate the message of Jesus Christ more effectively, making the message relevant to the life of individuals and societies, so that it may have an impact on contemporary societies and cultures.
41) A similar purpose is served in Luke's presentation of Paul's speech on the Areopagus in Athens, when the apostle tells his pagan listeners, "From one man (henos) he made every nation of humanity to dwell upon the entire face of the earth" (Acts 17:26).
calling from the Athenian Areopagus that great spokesman of the angelic institution, Dionysius.
By transferring jurisdiction in political cases from the Areopagus to popular organs, Ephialtes gave the demos an effective control over the executive offices that is tantamount to guardianship over the state; by extending to judicial proceedings the isonomia that Cleisthenes had given the people in legislative matters, he created popular sovereignty, which was justly called demokratia (14).
Scholars fit the flourishing of tragoidia into the context of Athens' relatively rapid, far-reaching, and unprecedented transition to democracy that began in 510 BCE with the overthrow of the Peisistratid tyranny, took decisive impetus shortly thereafter from the democratic reforms of Cleisthenes (which included reorganization of the tribal bases of Athenian identity), proceeded with Ephialtes' demotion of the aristocratic Court of Areopagus (462/1) and culminated in Pericles' lowering of the property requirement for the highest political office (458/7) and his institution of paid jury service (around 454).