insurgency

(redirected from Armed insurrection)
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insurgency

noun agitators, insurrection, rebellion, uprising
Associated concepts: counter insurgency strategy, global innurgency, quelling insurgency
See also: defiance, disloyalty, insurrection, mutiny, rebellion, revolt
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, as the demonstrations in Damascus turned to armed insurrection, Western leaders quickly aligned themselves on the side of the rebels.
It is too well known that India had created, armed and supported an armed insurrection in Sri Lanka by bringing discontented Tamils on one platform.
Well over 100,000 people have died in the Syrian conflict, which eventually turned into an armed insurrection after a violent security response to peaceful protests in March 2011.
The SPLM was formed in 1983 when an armed insurrection began in the South against the rule on president Jafar Niemary.
The UN says about 70,000 people have been killed in a conflict that began with peaceful anti-Assad protests and turned into an increasingly sectarian armed insurrection.
An armed insurrection must be a remedy available to the people of any free state.
The person who calls for freedom and change will almost certainly begin to think about armed insurrection, followed by the freedom of not thinking.
With an armed insurrection in the Sa'ada region, a growing southern secessionist movement, Al-Qaeda control of two southern cities and the recent toppling of Yemen's former President, Ali Abdullah Saleh, critics of Yemen's gun culture point to the destabilizing consequences of a population possessing 61 guns per 100 people.
Little wonder then that Swift observes, "With a growing number of parties competing for a shrinking pool of assets, the incentives for dissension and armed insurrection show few signs of subsiding." Indeed, he appears skeptical that President Saleh's replacement by his vice president, working within a GCC mandate, will satisfy disparate dissenters.
Though he personally rejected armed insurrection and preached peaceful conciliation, he sympathetically portrayed the insurrectionaries who had been forced to endure so many social and psychological injustices, and argued that ineffective politicians and the forces of reaction were responsible for this tragic 'explosion of desperation' (p.336).
This is most visible in the case of armed insurrection, and Eder and McKenna provide a succinct account of Muslim rebellion in the Philippines.