Talmud

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Talmud

the ancient law of the Jews, originally oral but later written down. It is now codified and is influential in dispute resolution among Jews. See DIN TORAH; BETH DIN.
References in periodicals archive ?
(ed.) The Babylonian Talmud, Seder Mo'ed, Tractate 'Erubin.Vol.
Yishai Kiel employs contextualized analysis of legal issues in Babylonian Talmud and Pahlavi literature to understand the intersections between them.
See Babylonian Talmud, Niddah 20b ("If a scholr ruled something impure, his fellow scholar is not allowed to rule it pure; if he forbade something, his fellow scholar is not allowed to permit it.").
There is an opinion in the Talmud (Babylonian Talmud, Shabbos 56b) that "Whoever maintains that Solomon sinned [by worshipping idols] is simply mistaken" (this opinion is accepted by many of the commentaries, e.g., Rashi and Ralbag).
255-257 (selections from Babylonian Talmud Berakhot 5a, BT Bava Metzia 85a, BT Menahot 29b, BT Makkot 24b, and Saadia Gaon)
"Tract Erubin," in New Edition of the Babylonian Talmud, Vol.
As Maimonides put it in the introduction to his Code, "All Israel is obliged to follow all the statements in the Babylonian Talmud. Every city and every province is compelled to conduct itself in accordance with the customs, decrees and regulations instituted by the sages of the Talmud, since all Israel agreed to accept them." (24)
(30) with the redaction of the Babylonian Talmud, regarded throughout Jewish history as the central book of Jewish law and life.
The Babylonian Talmud, as traditionally interpreted, does indicate that a prohibition on causing unnecessary suffering to animals is a Biblical mandate.
Including a feminist critique of crucial texts, such as Ovid's "Art of Love," the Babylonian Talmud, and Pliny the Younger's letters, Cohick's chapters chronologically progress through a typical first-century woman's life, beginning with the lifestyle of a daughter, the customary marriage and expectations as a wife, and the role as a mother.
The Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Sanhedrin delves into much of this material.