bail bondsman

(redirected from Bail bondsmen)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Bail bondsmen: Bail agent

bail bondsman

n. a professional agent for an insurance company who specializes in providing bail bonds for people charged with crimes and awaiting trial in order to have them released. The offices of a bail bondsman (or woman) are usually found close to the local court house and jail, his/her advertising is found in the yellow pages, and some make "house calls" to the jail or hand out cards in court. Bail bondsmen usually charge the suspect a fee of 10 percent of the amount of the bond. If a bail bondsman has reason to believe a person he/she bailed out is about to flee, he may revoke the bond and surrender his client to jail. (See: bail, bail bond)

bail bondsman

(mainly US) an individual or firm that lends BAIL money to defendants awaiting trial.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the majority of cases, however, commercial bail bondsmen add an additional level of financialization to this exchange.
owed to bail bondsmen, childcare providers, and lost wages; in life
They all knew his A&E reality show, in which he kicked in doors and pepper-sprayed fugitives for bail bondsmen around the country.
Bail bondsmen face substantial risks, both financially and physically, necessitating their substantial fees as insurance
Bounty hunters and bail bondsmen play an important but unsung role in a legal system whose court dockets are too crowded to provide swift justice.
Officers said the 22-year-old recently made a murder threat during a training class for bail bondsmen in Miami.
Officers say he made the murder threat during a training class for bail bondsmen.
That's because Childs' categories are those below-the-radar ones where musicians without stylists and bail bondsmen (sounds like a support group) reside: jazz.
Three US bail bondsmen have been arrested by police in El Salvador at the airport.
As passed in the House, REAL ID would severely limit immigrants' access to drivers' licenses by imposing federal regulations; give the Secretary of Homeland Security the right to waive laws in order to build more fences along the borders; and empower bounty hunters and bail bondsmen to pursue, arrest, detain--or surrender--immigrants to the Department of Homeland Security if they are thought to be "flight risks.
Other examples of "dirty work" include bail bondsmen (Davis, 1984), nursing home attendants (Stannard, 1973, Allen, 2004), and law enforcement officers (Heinler, Kleiman, and Stenross, 1990).
The producers have found a gaggle of New York bail bondsmen who are rough and tough but willing to occasionally look at the bigger picture.