Belief

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Belief

Mental reliance on or acceptance of a particular concept, which is arrived at by weighing external evidence, facts, and personal observation and experience.Belief is essentially a subjective feeling about the validity of an idea or set of facts. It is more than a mere suspicion and less than concrete knowledge. Unlike suspicion, which is based primarily on inner personal conviction, belief is founded upon assurance gained by empirical evidence and from other people. Positive knowledge, as contrasted with belief, is the clear perception of existing facts.

Belief has been defined as having faith in an idea or formulating a conclusion as the result of considering information. Information and belief is a legal term that is used to describe an allegation based upon Good Faith rather than firsthand knowledge.

belief

n. convinced of the truth of a statement or allegation. In a common phrase "upon information and belief," the so-called belief is based only on unconfirmed information, so the person declaring the belief is hedging his/her bet as to whether the belief is correct. (See: information and belief)

BELIEF. The conviction of the mind, arising from evidence received, or from information derived, not from actual perception by our senses, but from. the relation or information of others who have had the means of acquiring actual knowledge of the facts and in whose qualifications for acquiring that knowledge, and retaining it, and afterwards in communicating it, we can place confidence. " Without recurring to the books of metaphysicians' "says Chief Justice Tilghman, 4 Serg. & Rawle, 137, "let any man of plain common sense, examine the operations of, his own mind, he will assuredly find that on different subjects his belief is different. I have a firm belief that, the moon revolves round the earth. I may believe, too, that there are mountains and valleys in the moon; but this belief is not so strong, because the evidence is weaker." Vide 1 Stark. Ev. 41; 2 Pow. Mortg. 555; 1 Ves. 95; 12 Ves. 80; 1 P. A. Browne's R 258; 1 Stark. Ev. 127; Dyer, 53; 2 Hawk. c. 46, s. 167; 3 Wil. 1, s. 427; 2 Bl. R. 881; Leach, 270; 8 Watts, R. 406; 1 Greenl. Ev. Sec. 7-13, a.

References in classic literature ?
We may end our preliminary catalogue with BELIEF, by which I mean that way of being conscious which may be either true or false.
Idealism does not say that nothing can be known beyond the present thought, but it maintains that the context of vague belief, which we spoke of in connection with the thought of St.
His belief in these moments of dread was, that if he spontaneously did something right, God would save him from the consequences of wrong-doing.
"After all, the mediaeval belief in the Philosopher's Stone which could transmute metals, has its counterpart in the accepted theory of metabolism which changes living tissue.
Significant contributors to pain control include understanding the cause of pain, knowing a patient's pain beliefs, and having knowledge about coping mechanisms for dealing with pain.
And what happens when our brain gets attached to these false beliefs, when counter beliefs are brought to life and our internal beliefs are challenged?
As we grow up, we start forming beliefs; "I believe this is the only way I can cope up with...", or, "I believe the situation demands this..." and so on.
It is necessary, then, for us to have the freedom to seek and choose our beliefs, religious and non-religious.
Christians also embrace New Age beliefs. According to the Pew study, 61 percent of Americans who identify as Christian also buy into at least one of the following decidedly New Age/pagan beliefs: astrology (26 percent), reincarnation (29 percent), psychics (40 percent), and that spiritual energy can be found in physical things (42 percent).
This book explores the psychology of belief-how beliefs are formed, how they are influenced both by internal factors, such as perception, memory, reason, emotion, and prior beliefs, as well as external factors, such as experience, identification with a group, social pressure, and manipulation.
From Degrees of Belief to Binary Beliefs: Lessons from Judgment-Aggregation Theory, FRANZ DIETRICH and CHRISTIAN LIST