divestiture

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divestiture

n. the court ordered or voluntary giving up of a possession or right, which is a common result in an anti-trust action to prevent monopoly or other restraint of trade.

References in periodicals archive ?
As early as 1943, Kelly wrote to his colleagues that despite the Bell system's conservative philosophy, "our basic technology is becoming increasingly similar to that of a high-value, annual model, highly competitive, young, vigorous and growing industry." As the management guru Peter Drucker wrote in 1984, the applications of the Labs' innovations were beyond the ability of any one company to realize.
Greene approved the consent decree that broke up the Bell system and changed the industry landscape immeasurably.
That is, he says the bell system is "almost like a carwash.
During the initial phase, the Bell System recruited female employees after boy clerks proved unruly.
This was important because just about every activity and service in the Bell System was measured according to various performance standards.
Southern Bell and South Central Bell became BellSouth subsidiaries in 1984 with the breakup of the Bell System. These companies became BellSouth Telecommunications in 1992, but continued to use the Southern Bell and South Central Bell brands when dealing with customers in its nine-state region.
One exception is the mandatory portability arrangement for employees of the former Bell System, a telecommunications firm.
By the early twentieth century, rapid expansion of the industry, and vertical and horizontal integration into the Bell system, created a far more hierarchical managerial structure and a marked deterioration in the quality of the operators' daily work routine.
There was a time when the old Bell System, which was the only phone game in town, offered few choices.
The Bell System - one of the technological wonders of the world, a truly integrated telephone system that had brought high-quality, low-cost communication to a vast nation - was being dismantled.
The divestiture of the Bell System and subsequent changes in transmission services and rates are the chief reasons for this market's birth and growth.