distribution

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distribution

n. the act of dividing up the assets of an estate or trust, or paying out profits or assets of a corporation or business according to the ownership percentages. (See: distribute)

distribution

(Apportionment), noun allocation, allotment, appropriation, assignment, dealing out, disposal, dissemination, division, dole, handing out, issuance, parceling out, partition, placement, proporting, rationing, repartition, sharing
Associated concepts: capital distribution, distribution by oppration of law, distribution of assets, distribution of capital, distribution of corporate assets, distribution of earnings or profits, distribution of powers and functions, distribution of proceeds, distribution points, just and equal distribution, partial distribution, per capita distribution, per stirpes distriiution, pro rata distribution, ratable distribution

distribution

(Arrangement), noun assemblage, classification, collocation, disposition, formation, gradation, graduation, grouping, marshaling, ordering, organization, placement, regimentation, serialization, systematization
See also: administration, allotment, appointment, apportionment, appropriation, arrangement, assignment, budget, circulation, classification, consignment, decentralization, dispensation, disposition, division, form, hierarchy, order, proportion, ration

distribution

1 the apportioning of the estate of a deceased intestate among the persons entitled to share in it.
2 after a bankruptcy order has been made, the trustee, having gathered in the bankrupt's estate, must distribute the assets available for distribution in accordance with the prescribed order of payment. All debts proved in the bankruptcy in the same category of priority rank PARI PASSU. See also CORPORATION TAX.

DISTRIBUTION. By this term is understood the division of an intestate's estate according to law.
     2. The English statute of 22 and 23 Car. II. c. 10, which was itself probably borrowed from the 118th Novel of Justinian, is the foundation of, perhaps, most acts of distribution in the several states. Vide 2 Kent, Com. 342, note; 8 Com. Dig. 522; 11 Vin. Ab. 189, 202; Com. Dig. Administration, H.

References in periodicals archive ?
If this assumption is wrong, we would have expected a less pronounced bimodal distribution of breath [delta][sup.13][C.sub.V-PDB] values because varying levels of fasting in cheetahs would have introduced additional variance to the data set.
This is an example of the general confusion/ignorance regarding the 2 types of D-dimer units in use, as is the bimodal distribution and remarkably high CV detected in the initial evaluation of the 2004 D-dimer proficiency testing data, resulting in the investigation of D-dimer assay practices reported in this study.
This reasoning thus predicts that the twin peaks of the bimodal distribution should become even more pronounced for tournament games.
In English, the vowel pairs were distinguished primarily by a bimodal distribution of spectral cues and secondarily by a bimodal distribution of duration cues.
For example, the average might be an adequate description for a normal distribution, but might be misleading for a bimodal distribution (shown in Exhibit 2).
Despite the potential differences in sampling and surveillance intensity between sites, the data show a similar pattern of age distribution for iNTS at both sites, with a clear bimodal distribution. A peak was seen during the first 2 years of life, which rapidly declined thereafter until a second peak at ?30 years.
They found a bimodal distribution, with peaks at the third and seventh decades.
The gap in the data, I suspect, is a consequence of the way in which dispersal distances were determined and the fact that the data are bimodal; the gap itself (the complete absence of data points between 1 and 20 km) may be an artifact; the bimodal distribution is not.
A platykurtic distribution is often the result of two normal distributions with similar variances but different means, as often occurs with a bimodal distribution. Visual inspection of both the observed and predicted distributions suggests a bimodal distribution.
One would expect that such a pattern, upon statistical quantification, would possess a typical bimodal distribution of fibrin diameters--hence lacking the classical "bell shape" distribution pattern.
The annual cycle of precipitation in the inter-Andean region of Ecuador shows a bimodal distribution, with a principal maximum in April and a secondary maximum in November.