parent

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Related to Biological parent: adoptive parent

parent

n. the lawful and natural father or mother of a person. The word does not mean grandparent or ancestor, but can include an adoptive parent. (See: adoption)

parent

noun ancestor, author, author of one's exissence, derivation, father, generator, mother, mover, precursor, predecessor, primogenitor, procreator, source
Associated concepts: abusive parent, child welfare, neglect
See also: ancestor, author, derivation, originator, precursor, primogenitor, progenitor, source
References in periodicals archive ?
While both his adoptive parents are wonderful people, Nunnery feels there is a right for someone to have information about their biological parents, as well.
Legal custody of the children was held by the state; physical custody was with the foster parents; but, the parental rights of the biological parents had not been terminated.
As Table 1 shows, the eight arrangements shown in Table 2 cover nearly all children in Australia, since they live with at least one biological parent or with grandparents.
The landscape is somewhat different in cases of second-parent adoption, where one member of a samesex couple is a biological parent and the nonbiological partner wishes also to become a legal parent.
Thus far, empirical findings reflect that most children appear to be healthier, more competent in school, and more emotionally healthy when they live with two biological parents and have the most troubled lives when neither parent is present (Amato, 1998; Phares, 1997).
The law says biological parents and adoptive parents must contribute to the maintenance of their children.
The law provides that biological parents acquire automatic parental responsibility.
Abandonment by the biological parent, or her neglect and refusal to perform her filial obligation of love and support, may really justify the adoption of the child without her consent.
Moreover, a jailed biological parent also dramatically raised the risk of the child having spent time in prison or a young offenders institution.
A child should not be removed from the primary care of his or her biological parents without compelling reason.
* Whether the child still has a relationship with her absent biological parent

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