Black Letter Law

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Black Letter Law

A term used to describe basic principles of law that are accepted by a majority of judges in most states.

The term probably derives from the practice of publishers of encyclopedias and legal treatises to highlight principles of law by printing them in boldface type.

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3 (2006) 811-49; Joe Feagin, "Documenting the Costs of Slavery, Segregation and Contemporary Racism: Why Reparations Are in Order for African-Americans," Harvard Blackletter Law Journal 20 (2004) 49-81; Keith N.
None of the opinions, however, clearly ties either of these theories to the blackletter law of personal jurisdiction.
As every first-year law student learns, it is blackletter law that the "case or controversy" requirement of Article III limits the jurisdiction of federal courts exclusively to parties who can show some injury in-fact.
3d DCA 1980), which later courts misinterpreted as blackletter law.
The LTFRB was legally correct, but only demonstrated how going strictly by blackletter law can be the worst possible myopia.
from Harvard Law School, where he served as an executive editor of both the Harvard BlackLetter Law Journal and the Harvard Human Rights Journal.
Ogletree and Lani Guinier and was the executive editor of the Harvard BlackLetter Law Journal and the Harvard Human Rights Journal.
Schwartzreich L, 'Restructuring the framework for legal analyses of gay parenting', Harvard Blackletter Law Journal 21, pp 109-27, 2005
This one criticism does not taint the book's quality overall, but it does leave the reader somewhat unconvinced that the Supreme Court should have upheld the convictions in Cruikshank while following the blackletter law.
For example, it is blackletter law that the Constitution allows racial classifications if the governmental interest is sufficiently weighty.
128) Furthermore, state statutory constructive trusts are consistent with the blackletter law of the Egelhoff ruling, because such trusts would not be invalidated by ERISA's "relate to" preemption analysis set forth by the Court.
The activities of the Australian Competition and Consumers Commission, other agencies of government and industry groups to come to grips with ever-increasing amounts of blackletter law by way of codes of conduct presuppose an established environment in which business people understand the manner, and appreciate the advantages, of operating and doing business in an ethical world with ethical markets.