accounts receivable

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accounts receivable

n. the amounts of money due or owed to a business or professional by customers or clients. Generally, accounts receivable refers to the total amount due and is considered in calculating the value of a business or the business' problems in paying its own debts. Evaluation of the chances of collecting based on history of customers' payments, quality of customers and age of the accounts receivable and debts is important. A big mistake made by people overly-eager to buy a business is to give too high a value to the accounts receivable without considering the chances of collection.

accretion: n. 1) in real estate, the increase of the actual land on a stream, lake or sea by the action of water which deposits soil upon the shoreline. Accretion is Mother Nature's little gift to a landowner. 2) in estates, when a beneficiary of the person who died gets more of the estate than he/she was meant to because another beneficiary or heir dies or rejects the gift. Example: if a brother and sister were supposed to divide a share of Dad's estate, but Brother doesn't want it, then Sister's share grows by accretion. 3) in trusts, accretion occurs when a beneficiary gets a surprising increase in benefits due to an unexpected event. (See: probate, trust)

References in periodicals archive ?
She also argues that book debt and commodity money exchanges "confined commercial transactions to relatively insular communities," (38) as though mere currency would have overcome poor transportation networks, rocky soil, low population density, the high cost of labor relative to land, and every other impediment to the production of a commercial surplus, and propelled people into a wider economic world.
5 billion in debt over the last 10 years to a level where consolidated book debt is under $1 billion.
Businesses may need to start shopping around for fresh sources of borrowing this autumn as new rules start to kick in that govern the use of book debts as security, warns Vicki Simpson, property finance partner at Birmingham law firm, Needham & James.
However, it has also caused nervousness among business people who in the past have considered that their personal guarantees would be relatively safe from the bank in the event of liquidation as the overdraft would be covered by the book debt proceeds.
Now, as a result of the High Court ruling, banks can only retrieve money from book debt after the demands of employees and liquidators have been satisfied.
It is not sufficient simply to prohibit disposal or other transfer of the book debts, for example by factoring, if the company is allowed to collect in and use the book debt proceeds freely.
The ratings also assume that book debt will remain near $331 million in the near-term.
Book debt to equity ratio (including operating leases and hedges) moved from 51:49 at 30 June 2003 to 50:50 at 31 December 2003, principally as a result of stronger earnings during the half-year.
Accordingly, total book debt to capital is expected to be 130%-140% by year-end 2004 and remain near 100% through 2007.
Book debt to equity ratio moved from 49:51 at 30 June 2002 to 51:49 at 30 June 2003, principally as a result of the substantial investment in capital equipment made during the year.
Vivendi Universal's net book debt (gross debt less cash under French accounting principles) at December 31, 2002 is expected to be in the order of E13 billion.
Total book debt to capitalization at 57% remains aggressive for this ratings category.