invasion of privacy

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Related to Breach of privacy: Privacy law

invasion of privacy

n. the intrusion into the personal life of another, without just cause, which can give the person whose privacy has been invaded a right to bring a lawsuit for damages against the person or entity that intruded. However, public personages are not protected in most situations, since they have placed themselves already within the public eye, and their activities (even personal and sometimes intimate) are considered newsworthy, i.e. of legitimate public interest. However, an otherwise non-public individual has a right to privacy from: 1) intrusion on one's solitude or into one's private affairs; 2) public disclosure of embarrassing private information; 3) publicity which puts him/her in a false light to the public; 4) appropriation of one's name or picture for personal or commercial advantage. Lawsuits have arisen from magazine articles on obscure geniuses, use of a wife's name on a hospital insurance form to obtain insurance payment for delivery of a mistress' baby, unauthorized use of a girl's photo to advertise a photographer, and "tabloid" journalism treatment of people as freaks. There are also numerous instances of governmental invasion of privacy such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation compiling files on people considered as political opponents, partially corrected by the passage of the Freedom of Information Act in 1966. The right to privacy originated with an article in the Harvard Law Review in the 1890s written by lawyers "Bull" Warren and future Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis.

References in periodicals archive ?
allegations of breach of privacy which fell outside the remit of Operation
Confirming Fallon's intention to sue the News of the World, solicitor Christopher Stewart-Moore said yesterday: "We have sent out a letter before action and are now in the course of preparing proceedings regarding a breach of privacy.
In principle, this regulation defines a wide access to institution documents, except (Article 4) when there is a risk of a breach of privacy, in accordance with the privacy law drawn up by the Court of Human Rights or the investigation objectives of the institution.
Mathew Firsht and Applause Store Productions Limited (Applause Store) were awarded pounds 22,000 for libel and breach of privacy in relation to a fake personal profile and group which was added to Facebook by an old school friend of Mr Firsht, with whom he had fallen out.
I MUST say that I support Lord Carey's view when he writes of Max Mosley's pounds 60,000 award for damages for breach of privacy.
The fact that Mr Mosley pursued an action for breach of privacy has fascinated readers almost as much as the allegations.
It may be that elsewhere in the country the mark has been overstepped and legitimate surveillance has become a breach of privacy.
That expired last Saturday, creating a legal vacuum airlines feared could expose them to breach of privacy suits.
Other insurance policies will necessarily have to address the issue of other types of allegations of breach of privacy, but it is of some importance that the EPL policy cover such allegations from employees, and not all policies currently available provide this important protection.
Some CEOs would see Hobgood's presence as a workplace distraction or a breach of privacy.
Christine Carter claimed Ardent's filming at Prince William's university, was not the first time Edward had allegedly been in breach of privacy.
And a murderer who wrote letters confessing in terrible detail to the sex killing of a three-year-old girl has got legal aid to sue for breach of privacy.