commission

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commission

n. 1) a fee paid based on a percentage of the sale made by an employee or agent, as distinguished from regular payments of wages or salary. 2) a group appointed pursuant to law to conduct certain government business, especially regulation. These include from the local planning or zoning commission to the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Federal Trade Commission.

commission

(Act), noun accomplishment, actualization, actuation, attainment, carrying out, completion, consummation, discharge, dispatch, doing, effecting, effectuation, enactment, enforcement, execution, exercise, exercising, fruition, fulfilment, implementation, inflicting, infliction, making, mandatum, operation, realization, transaction
Associated concepts: commission of crime

commission

(Agency), noun advisory group, appointed group, board, board of inquiry, body of commissioners, body of delegates, body of deputies, bureau, cabinet, consultants, convocation, council, delegation, deliberative group, embassy, executive committee, investigating committee, planning board, representatives, standing committee, trustees
Associated concepts: advisory body, Federal Trade Commission, Municipal Commission, Public Service Commission

commission

(Fee), noun allotment, allowance, bonus, compensation, consideration, defrayment, dividend, earnings, emolument, extra commensation, increment, interest, pay, pay-off, payment, percentage, percentage compensation, portion, proceeds, profit, recompense, reimbursement, remuneration, return, reward, salary, share of profits, stipend, wage
Associated concepts: broker's commission, commission merchant, compensation, fees, finder's commission, profits
See also: act, agency, allow, appoint, assign, assignment, authorize, bestow, board, brokerage, bureau, charge, command, commit, committee, constitute, delegate, delegation, deputation, designate, designation, detail, dictate, direction, discharge, duty, earnings, embassy, employ, employment, empower, engage, entrust, establish, hire, induct, infliction, instruction, interest, invest, let, mission, nominate, obligation, performance, permit, post, retain, share, task, transaction, undertaking, vest, warrant

COMMISSION, contracts, civ. law. When one undertakes, without reward, to do something for another in respect to a thing bailed. This term is frequently used synonymously with mandate. (q.v.) Ruth. Inst. 105; Halifax, Analysis of the Civil Law, 70. If the service the party undertakes to perform for another is the custody of his goods, this particular sort of, commission is called a charge.
     2. In a commission, the obligation on his part who undertakes it, is to transact the business without wages, or any other reward, and to use the same care and diligence in it, as if it were his own.
     3. By commission is also understood an act performed, opposed to omission, which is the want of performance of such an act; is, when a nuisance is created by an act of commission, it may be abated without notice; but when it arises from omission, notice to remove it must be given before it is abated. 1 Chit. Pr. 711. Vide Abatement of Nuisances; Branches; Trees.

COMMISSION, office. Persons authorized to act in a certain matter; as, such a matter was submitted, to the commission; there were several meetings before the commission. 4 B. & Cr. 850; 10 E. C. L. R. 459.

COMMISSION, crim. law. The act of perpetrating an offence. There are crimes of commission and crimes of omission.

COMMISSION, practice. An instrument issued by a court of, justice, or other competent tribunal, to authorize a person to take depositions, or do any other act by authority of such court, or tribunal, is called a commission. For a form of a commission to take. depositions, see Gresley, Eq. Ev. 72.

References in periodicals archive ?
For the tenants, not having to pay a 15% broker's commission, means that they will have more money to spend on rent," Rosenberg explained.
However, in order for there to be a "willful default' by the seller which will trigger the broker's commission, there must be a complete agreement to sell the property to the purchaser.
The brokerage agreement provided that the broker's commission would be paid not by the tenants, but by the landlord of the space ultimately rented by them.
It is only when the seller wrongfully or arbitrarily prevents the completion of a deal does a broker's commission become due.
However, as evidenced by the proposed lease drafts, it was undisputed that all concerned parties contemplated that the landlord would pay the broker's commission.