commission

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commission

n. 1) a fee paid based on a percentage of the sale made by an employee or agent, as distinguished from regular payments of wages or salary. 2) a group appointed pursuant to law to conduct certain government business, especially regulation. These include from the local planning or zoning commission to the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Federal Trade Commission.

commission

(Act), noun accomplishment, actualization, actuation, attainment, carrying out, completion, consummation, discharge, dispatch, doing, effecting, effectuation, enactment, enforcement, execution, exercise, exercising, fruition, fulfilment, implementation, inflicting, infliction, making, mandatum, operation, realization, transaction
Associated concepts: commission of crime

commission

(Agency), noun advisory group, appointed group, board, board of inquiry, body of commissioners, body of delegates, body of deputies, bureau, cabinet, consultants, convocation, council, delegation, deliberative group, embassy, executive committee, investigating committee, planning board, representatives, standing committee, trustees
Associated concepts: advisory body, Federal Trade Commission, Municipal Commission, Public Service Commission

commission

(Fee), noun allotment, allowance, bonus, compensation, consideration, defrayment, dividend, earnings, emolument, extra commensation, increment, interest, pay, pay-off, payment, percentage, percentage compensation, portion, proceeds, profit, recompense, reimbursement, remuneration, return, reward, salary, share of profits, stipend, wage
Associated concepts: broker's commission, commission merchant, compensation, fees, finder's commission, profits
See also: act, agency, allow, appoint, assign, assignment, authorize, bestow, board, brokerage, bureau, charge, command, commit, committee, constitute, delegate, delegation, deputation, designate, designation, detail, dictate, direction, discharge, duty, earnings, embassy, employ, employment, empower, engage, entrust, establish, hire, induct, infliction, instruction, interest, invest, let, mission, nominate, obligation, performance, permit, post, retain, share, task, transaction, undertaking, vest, warrant

COMMISSION, contracts, civ. law. When one undertakes, without reward, to do something for another in respect to a thing bailed. This term is frequently used synonymously with mandate. (q.v.) Ruth. Inst. 105; Halifax, Analysis of the Civil Law, 70. If the service the party undertakes to perform for another is the custody of his goods, this particular sort of, commission is called a charge.
     2. In a commission, the obligation on his part who undertakes it, is to transact the business without wages, or any other reward, and to use the same care and diligence in it, as if it were his own.
     3. By commission is also understood an act performed, opposed to omission, which is the want of performance of such an act; is, when a nuisance is created by an act of commission, it may be abated without notice; but when it arises from omission, notice to remove it must be given before it is abated. 1 Chit. Pr. 711. Vide Abatement of Nuisances; Branches; Trees.

COMMISSION, office. Persons authorized to act in a certain matter; as, such a matter was submitted, to the commission; there were several meetings before the commission. 4 B. & Cr. 850; 10 E. C. L. R. 459.

COMMISSION, crim. law. The act of perpetrating an offence. There are crimes of commission and crimes of omission.

COMMISSION, practice. An instrument issued by a court of, justice, or other competent tribunal, to authorize a person to take depositions, or do any other act by authority of such court, or tribunal, is called a commission. For a form of a commission to take. depositions, see Gresley, Eq. Ev. 72.

References in periodicals archive ?
The same breach was committed by Assurebrook Financial Services of Orpington, Kent, whose ads targeted those with credit problems but didn't mention its broker's fees.
Wang Laboratories, Inc., if a tenant abandons its lease with two years remaining on the term, and the landlord subsequently re-lets the premises for 10 years, i.e., the final two years of the old lease term plus 8 additional years, then the landlord can only recover 20 percent of the costs of re-letting, e.g., broker's fees or tenant work, because the remainder of the old lease term constitutes only 20 percent of the term of the new lease signed.
While market reports show rents have gone down in Manhattan, Fritz Frigan, the executive director of sales and leasing for Halstead Property, said an even better measure of the state of the rental market is how many buildings are covering broker's fees. Many landlords will offer to pay broker's fees instead of lowering rents because that means starting at a lower base when renewing leases.