Casebook

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Casebook

A printed compilation of judicial decisions illustrating the application of particular principles of a specific field of law, such as torts, that is used in Legal Education to teach students under the Case Method system.

References in periodicals archive ?
The protocol now uses a single folder, although the table of contents is divided into volumes so that anyone using a paper version can print and bind the casebook," he says.
Viewed globally, the current field of criminal law casebooks represents an impressive collection of learning methods, though as a whole there are still unmet needs for teachers who cannot find the right casebook with the right ratios of cases to doctrine and theory to practice--in a flexible and modular format that allows professors to teach the way they want to.
Casebooks were qualitatively analyzed using text analysis (Silverman, 2000).
In this paper I have reflected on the nearly twenty-five years I have been involved in editing a constitutional law casebook. In the process of examining the various editions of the casebook to the present, I realize, more than I otherwise would have, the fundamental way that developments quite apart from the intentions of the editors--in politics, in the Supreme Court, and in the academy--continuously redefine the canon and thereby trespass indelibly on the original goal of a short, concise teaching tool.
This casebook represented a radical departure from the traditional mold both in terms of organization and content.
The LEXIS-NEXIS Millennium Initiative furnishes law faculty with the software platform to transform course materials into electronic casebooks and enables students to use their personal computers to access and integrate information from a variety of sources.
Despite the late date of this casebook, about ten percent were illiterate, or could read and write only 'a little.' The most commonly noted parental occupation was labourer (thirteen percent).
By providing written Decision Casebooks in advance, borrowers and lenders can see eyeto-eye and speak the same language.
Electronic Casebooks should: improve the quality of advocacy, for both counsel and court; increase courts efficiency in preparation, in hearing time, and in judgment-writing; advance access to justice by being accessible and lowering the expense of court processes.
My admiration for the late Fred Rodell gives me an excuse, if not a reason, for keeping the number of footnotes in this document as small as possible.(1) Otherwise I would, of course, have footnote references to the other articles in this Symposium, particularly Jerry Barron's article, "Capturing the Canon." Those articles have provided us with both an excellent overview of developments in the casebooks and rationales for the decisions of casebook authors.
Under an agreement with LEXIS-NEXIS, seven law professors from Harvard University Law, School will create electronic course materials for law school, authoring an electronic series of lectures and casebooks for use with LEXIS-NEXIS Student Office.
Augmenting the print edition is an online version that has a wide range of resources not found in standard casebooks, among them more than 200 photographs, maps, and diagrams.