casuistry

(redirected from Casuists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.

casuistry

noun behaviorism, deontology, ethical philosophy, ethology, idealism, moral science, perfectionism, sophistry, utilitarianism
See also: duplicity, ethics, sophistry
References in periodicals archive ?
There is, however, no question in my mind that his approach is at least as defensible from a philosophical point of view as those of Kantians, utilitarians, casuists, or particularists.
identifies Ames and his mentor, Perkins (see supra note 39), as among the most influential Puritan casuists of the period.
Hale could have in mind collections of common law "maxims" in addition to the casuists and schoolmen mentioned above.
73) Brownson, in a statement of staggering audacity, commends the Catholic Church for its moderation: "Only the church, which can be surprised by no new moral or social question, which has nothing to learn from experience, and whose doctrines on all subjects are long ago determined and fixed, remains unaffected by the fanaticism around her, and pays no attention to the decisions of modern casuists.
The most important is that I have yet to encounter a particularist who does not also have at least a few impassioned universalist commitments--otherwise contextualist feminists who make a universal claim for the reproductive rights of women; communitarians who would under no circumstances allow human subjects to be used against their will, even for potentially life-saving medical research; and casuists who would not for a moment countenance deliberately discriminatory health policies that favored the affluent.
18) Kopfensteiner's selection of the manualists' casuistry is important: unlike the high casuists of the 16th and 17th century who used their casuistry to open up moral teachings by entertaining a variety of previously unconsidered circumstances, their successors resisted assiduously the influence of circumstances and were convinced that moral truth standards were found in the unchangeable.
But casuists unabashedly rely upon narrative construction and anchor their method in a celebration of Aristotle's concept of practical wisdom (phronesis).
A few specific examples of cases discussed by Catholic casuists will help illustrate the range of moral questions the category of cooperation was designed to illuminate.
While casuists have called for larger numbers of cases and contextual ethicists have appealed for thicker ones, narrative continues to be used by most ethicists in a somewhat naive way, as if it simply reproduced reality without also interpreting the world in a manner that colors the reader's perspective of those events.
This dynamic helps them to see that their hermeneutics is not a circle, but a spiral: casuists facing the horizon of oncoming moral issues determine their solutions as they subsequently determine their communities?