Contusion

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CONTUSION, med. jurisp. An injury or lesion, arising from the shock of a body with a large surface, which presents no loss of substance, and no apparent wound. If the skin be divided, the injury takes the name of a contused wound. Vide 1 Ch. Pr, 38; 4 Carr. & P. 381, 487, 558, 565; 6 Carr. & P. 684; 2 Beck's Med. Jur. 178.

References in periodicals archive ?
This group of patients is not homogeneous when it comes to the extent of damage caused by head trauma meaning the presence of temporal bone fractures, cerebral contusion, or intracranial hemorrhage as shown in our study; however, they all suffered from deafness, and the intragroup post-implantation results did not vary.
It is generally well accepted among neuroradiologists that the HU (and therefore density) of cerebral contusions decreases over time.
He remembered nothing until waking up in hospital where he was found to have a cerebral contusion to his cranial lobe, bruising around his eyes and cut lips and was kept in hospital to be monitored although did not need specific treatment to his head injury before he was released.
Nineteen patients (1.7%) were referred to a tertiary centre because of deterioration in general condition and coexisting pathologies, including spinal injury due to vertebral fracture (n=5), subdural haemorrhage and cerebral contusion (n=4), hemorrhagic shock due to laceration of liver
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by a direct mechanical insult to the brain induces cerebral contusion and motor and cognitive dysfunction [1-4].
A computed tomography (CT) scan upon admission revealed a depressed skull fracture with an underlying frontal cerebral contusion and intraparenchymal bone fragments (Fig.
Development of glioblastoma multiforme following traumatic cerebral contusion: case report and review of literature.
These authors referred to two other cases in the literature of hemorrhage into a lacerated frontal lobe occurring several weeks after "cerebral blast concussion" (shell explosion) with no solid blow to the head and to additional case reports of cerebral edema, petechial and meningeal hemorrhages, cerebral contusion and laceration, and intracerebral and subdural hematoma after a cerebral blast injury.
While air-filled organs are especially susceptible, the brain is vulnerable to direct injury from cerebral contusion or indirect injury--a cerebral infarction secondary to air emboli.
The council member was hospitalized with a diagnosis of a closed craniocerebral injury, cerebral contusion,cough fracture, a compound wound in the occipital region.
A computed tomography scan demonstrated a cerebral contusion in the right frontotemporal lobe, an intracerebral hematoma, and a comminuted fracture of the right frontotemporal skull [Figure 1].