charitable contribution

(redirected from Charitable contributions)
Also found in: Financial.

charitable contribution

n. in taxation, a contribution to an organization which is officially created for charitable, religious, educational, scientific, artistic, literary, or other good works. Such contributions are deductible from gross income, and thus lower the taxes paid. (See: charitable remainder trust, charity)

References in periodicals archive ?
Nonprofits across the suburbs are bracing for the effects of the federal tax overhaul, hoping people will continue to make charitable contributions in 2018 even though fewer taxpayers are expected to itemize deductions next year.
A recent Tax Court memorandum decision dramatically demonstrates two important points about charitable contributions: 1) the charitable contribution deduction rules are highly complicated and full of traps for the unwary, and 2) the IRS strictly interprets and applies those rules, especially with respect to significant noncash charitable donations.
In determining which charitable contributions are deductible in a given tax year, current-year contributions take priority over carryover contributions.
Issues contributing to noncompliance included a lack of proper attached forms; incorrectly completed Forms 8283, Noncash Charitable Contributions, or those with incorrectly reported items; and unclear descriptions of donated property (see related graphic, "Noncash Charitable Contribution Errors Remain High").
After a two-year drop in charitable contributions brought on by the Great Recession, donations from individuals, corporations and foundations have rebounded according to Giving USA Foundation, an organization that tracks philanthropy through research and education.
Percentage increase in charitable contributions to American universities between 1997 and 2007: 6.
Charitable contributions are generally fully deductible as long as your itemized deductions exceed the standard deduction and you don't surpass statutory limits--50%, 30% or 20% of your adjusted gross income (AGI), depending on what you donate and whether the recipient is a public charity on an operating or non-operating foundation.
Adjusted gross income limitations on the amount of charitable contributions allowed as an itemized deduction.
Worse, because we do not make our charitable contributions part of the larger financial plan tied to our wealth-building objectives (including tax strategies), we often end up with little or no income for intentional, strategic giving.
The federal government is now withdrawing its support largely because of the new charitable contributions rules.
While philanthropy continues to be important to our communities, a provision in a recently passed law may make charitable contributions even more pervasive.
The legislation, similar to the recently passed Senate CARE Act, would expand charitable resources by providing Americans who do not itemize on their tax returns the opportunity to deduct a portion of their charitable contributions; providing incentives for individuals to make tax-free contributions to charity from their individual retirement accounts; raising the cap on corporate charitable contributions from 10 percent to 20 percent; and reauthorizing a program to allow low-income, working Americans to build assets through matched savings accounts.