borough

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BOROUGH. An incorporated town; so called in the charter. It is less than a city. 1 Mann. & Gran. 1; 39 E. C. L. R. 323.

References in periodicals archive ?
Taipei Deputy Mayor Charles Lin said the city government welcomes self-driving vehicle developers to test their vehicles on the testing ground.
He also reiterated his recognition of the 'best efforts' that the officials and employees of the city government have done since he became the mayor of the city in 2013.
Talking about the issues of public transport in the city, he said that his city government had devised a mass transit project.
Through uberGov, Osmena said, the city government could track employees' movements 'to make sure they're actually doing their jobs.
Farglory was responding to a June 8 city government order to present a "concrete plan within one month to improve public safety and other required matters" over 3 months for the dome project or face cancellation of the deal.
local time and covered an area of about 200 square meters (2,000 square feet), Huangshi city government said in a statement on its website.
city government -- namely a responsibility-free working environment and absurdly lax work rules.
After reading the conclusions of his visit to the US, the city government called on the Urban Development Corporation (UDC), a public agency set up in 1999 to help stimulate inner cities through rebuilding projects, to make an inventory of vacant land in Osaka.
CBO respondents point to city government as the primary obstacle to effective collaboration.
It is hardly any wonder that a nearly decade-long dependence on the city government for flour, coal, wood, and gas bred animosity.
a huge entertainment conglomerate (formerly MCA), and the Osaka city government to build a whiz-bang Universal Studios theme park on an old 140-acre industrial site in the city.
AS IF MARKET RIGORS IN A CITY where hotel occupancy rates average only 70 percent weren't rough enough, the hotel industry in Tampa, Florida, is about to face a new, tax-exempt competitor: their own city government.