civil liberty

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civil liberty

the right of an individual to certain freedoms of speech and action. Now often mediated through HUMAN RIGHTS law.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was the botched investigation of atomic scientist Wen Ho Lee, in which FBI mistakes mined a suspect widely believed to be guilty into a hem in some Asian and civil libertarian circles.
Dershowitz himself, by recently making some controversial ends-justify-means public remarks that have raised the eyebrows of civil libertarians, has provided proof that, whether or not we agree on the origins of rights, more relevant contemporary issues remain unresolved.
Then there is the dangerously broad definition of who can be deemed terrorists, which has resulted in what civil libertarians call "mission creep.
As many civil libertarians have observed, this definition of terrorism could easily be applied to any political demonstration at which a single act of violence or even disorderly conduct occurs: in other words, someone who upends or throws a garbage can during a protest march could be guilty of terrorism and sentenced to life in prison.
Rumsfeld declined to take my advice as Religious Right leaders circled the wagons around Boykin's "free speech" rights as if they were suddenly the world's greatest civil libertarians.
True, civil libertarians might object to this--so let's give them mild electronic shocks as well.
That take-no-prisoners approach sends chills down the spines of civil libertarians concerned about the tyranny of the majority.
Allegations that Education Secretary Roderick Paige made inappropriate comments about religion and schools recently led lawmakers and civil libertarians and education groups to call for an apology or resignation.
In Illinois, the compromise between physicians and civil libertarians requires HIV counseling for pregnant women and an opt-in for testing.
Because of the privacy issues it raises, the USA PATRIOT Act, which gives federal agents broad powers to investigate and track potential terrorists, continues to rile librarians and civil libertarians.
In political disputes, few minds, let alone hearts, are changed by evidence; following one's beliefs to their logical conclusion can lead to mess and contradiction; and focusing on "preserving fair processes rather than obtaining particular results," as she says civil libertarians do, will sooner or later tick off everyone who cares about a par ticular result.