clergy

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clergy

ministers, priests or pastors of churches. Historically clergy were exempt from trial or punishment before the secular courts, which was known as benefit of clergy. On the other hand, until the House of Commons (Removal of Clergy Disqualification) Act 2001, clergy could not sit in the House of Commons. (Lords Spiritual who sit in the House of Lords are still excluded from the Commons.)
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

CLERGY. All who are attached to the ecclesiastical ministry are called the clergy; a clergyman is therefore an ecclesiastical minister.
     2. Clergymen were exempted by the emperor Constantine from all civil burdens. Baronius ad ann. 319, Sec. 30. Lord Coke says, 2 Inst. 3, ecclesiastical persons have more and greater liberties than other of the king's subjects, wherein to set down all, would take up a whole volume of itself.
     3. In the United States the clergy is not established by law, but each congregation or church may choose its own clergyman.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the target audience for this initial project was clergywomen, the principles and strategies apply to anyone seeking to align attitude and behaviors into an integrated, intentional approach to health.
De Four-Babb and Tenia argue that these clergywomen's stories highlight that despite personal characteristics such as resilience and tenacity supported by faith, which help them overcome their challenges, infrastructural and policy requirements need to be strengthened in the Diocese if more and younger women are to enter the clergy and rise to the highest ranks of leadership.
Among the topics are a sociological perspective, an empirical study among Dutch young people on separation of church and state and freedom of religion, religion's construction of public significance through the bioethical discourse, the changing experiences of clergywomen in the Church of England, accessing the ordinary theology of personal prayer, how Christian students in Tamil Nadu think about power-driven religious conflicts, how Catholic teachers of religion from five European countries perceived other religions, and religion in German preschool education as a public issue still denied.
Right: The History of American Clergywomen. New York, NY: Crossroad
''We are going to redeploy troops of the two parties from where they are now stationed, and will leave Cambodian Buddhist monks and clergywomen in the pagoda,'' Hun Sen said.
Likewise, clergical cemeteries in the region, or other non-clerical cemeteries with burials of clergywomen and men, such as Albury, Beechworth, and Wagga Wagga do not have full-length Latin inscriptions.
In 2000, the SBC revoked the decision, leaving about 1,600 Southern Baptist clergywomen in an ambiguous position.
Frame and Shehan looked at clergywomen's management of multiple roles in a primarily male career.
This book examines the effects of gender, professional experience, and religious belief on the political attitudes and activism of clergywomen.
In this qualitative study of clergywomen (N = 190), the authors examined the impact of being female in a male-dominated occupation, particularly one that has been traditionally structured as a "2-person career." They argue that career counselors are in a unique position to prepare future clergywomen for the special challenges they will face in the ministry and make recommendations for ways in which career counselors may serve this distinctive population.
TV VICAR Dawn French joined 200 clergywomen seeking an end to world poverty yesterday.