client

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Client

A person who employs or retains an attorney to represent him or her in any legal business; to assist, to counsel, and to defend the individual in legal proceedings; and to appear on his or her behalf in court.

This term includes a person who divulges confidential matters to an attorney while pursuing professional assistance, regardless of sub-sequent employment of the attorney. This attorney-client relationship is quite complex and extensive in its scope. One of the key aspects of this relationship is confidentiality of communications. A client has the right to require that his or her attorney keep secret any discussion between them during the course of their relationship that pertains to the matters for which the attorney is hired. This protection extends to a person who might have disclosed any confidential matters while seeking aid from an attorney, whether the attorney was employed or not. If, for example, someone is "shopping" for an attorney to handle a Divorce, the person might reveal certain private information to several attorneys, all of whom are expected to keep such communications confidential.

Cross-references

Attorney-Client Privilege.

client

noun business contact, buyer of labor, cliens, consultor, consumer, customer, employer of legal advice, hirer, offerer, patron, patron of professional servies, person employing advice, person represented, person represented by counsel, purchaser, retainer of counsel
Associated concepts: attorney-client privilege, attorneyylient relationship
See also: consumer, customer, patron

CLIENT, practice. One who employs and retains an attorney or counsellor to manage or defend a suit or action in which he is a party, or to advise him about some legal matters.
     2. The duties of the client towards his counsel are, 1st. to give him a written authority, 1 Ch. Pr. 19; 2. to disclose his case with perfect candor3. to offer spontaneously, advances of money to his attorney; 2 Ch. Pr. 27; 4. he should, at the end of the suit, promptly pay his attorney his fees. Ib. His rights are, 1. to be diligently served in the management of his business 2. to be informed of its progress and, 3. that his counsel shall not disclose what has been professionally confided to him. See Attorney at law; Confidential communication.

References in classic literature ?
Vholes with the severity of a determined man, "when I ultimately congratulate you, sir, with all my heart, on your accession to fortune--which, but that I never give hopes, I might say something further about--you will owe me nothing beyond whatever little balance may be then outstanding of the costs as between solicitor and client not included in the taxed costs allowed out of the estate.
The client, with his dejection insensibly relieved and his vague hopes rekindled, takes pen and ink and writes the draft, not without perplexed consideration and calculation of the date it may bear, implying scant effects in the agent's hands.
A good riddance to me, whether as clerk or client! Well, Tony, that as I was mentioning is what they're up to."
"I am not the sort of client for a gentleman of such note, but he is so good!"
* Software applications, including those that use Monte Carlo Simulation, have changed the way many financial analysts now determine clients' retirement planning needs.
In the case of internal succession, the purchase price for an owner's interest is usually based on either a percentage or multiple of the retiring partner's compensation prior to the retirement, or of fees received from the retiring partner's clients during a certain time period after the partner's retirement.
Most CPAs agree it is in everyone's best interests to match clients with CPA firms that are best suited to the clients' specific needs.
Three key aspects of AdFarm's ongoing growth are performance leadership, greater insights into large-production agriculture, and truly "connecting with customers." All are critical to our clients' short- and long-term success.
They briefly summarize and critique extant career counseling models for racial/ethnic minority clients and then describe an expanded model for career counseling that incorporates metacognition processes for addressing counselor-related cultural factors.
These themes are illustrated by discussing the findings of a comparative survey of welfare service barriers experienced by Haitian and Hispanic welfare clients in Miami-Dade county.
According to a recent study by educational research company QED, 15 percent of districts in the United States are using thin clients, and another 15 percent are considering them.