Cosigner

(redirected from Co-Signers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial.

Cosigner

An obligor—a person who becomes obligated, under a Commercial Paper, such as a promissory note or check—by signing the instrument in conjunction with the original obligor, thereby promising to pay it in full.

The cosigner may be held equally responsible for the payment of the debt or may be required to pay only upon the failure of the original obligor to do so, depending upon state law and the terms of the agreement that also determine the rights of the cosigner.

Cosigner is synonymous with the term comaker.

See: comaker
References in periodicals archive ?
The loans are both public and private, and about three-quarters were taken to finance a child's or grandchild's college education as a borrower or co-signer.
Summary: The University of Chicago has signed a participation letter with the new International Student Loan Programme (ISLP), which will provide loans requiring no co-signer to international students at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.
1% Encourage students to get a co-signer on loan applications 77.
8bn, of which the five co-signers will pay approximately SEK0.
Even though they declared their intent to continue to serve on defensive missions, Shapira and his co-signers were promptly dismissed from the Air Force.
Nine days after 9-11, William Kristol wrote the president on behalf of PNAC and 36 co-signers urging an attack on Iraq "even if evidence does not link Iraq" to the 9-11 terrorist attacks.
For instance, 38 per cent of immigrants trying to find suitable housing cited at least one problem with the most common being the high costs of housing, and the lack of guarantors or co-signers.
ASAE joined about 50 co-signers who support the argument that increasing access to information pertaining to charities through private and public initiatives, coupled with enforcing current laws that categorically prohibit fraud, is the most responsive way to protect potential donors from disingenuous groups.
In a surprising show of support for an area that is usually far from the Congressional radar screen, there were 28 co-signers of letter.
Many co-signers think they are simply vouching for the borrower's integrity.
The letter, dated April 9, stated that the co-signers had "grave concerns about [the defense] department's apparent decision to withhold significant information.