(redirected from Coincidences)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
References in classic literature ?
Still, the coincidence of our being together on the coach, was sufficiently strange to fill me with a dread that some other coincidence might at any moment connect me, in his hearing, with my name.
In this situation there must be a peculiar coincidence of circumstances to insure success to the popular resistance.
Danglars comprehended the full extent of the wretched fate that overwhelmed Dantes; and, when Napoleon returned to France, he, after the manner of mediocre minds, termed the coincidence, "a decree of Providence.
His sisters' uneasiness had been equally excited with my own; our coincidence of feeling was soon discovered, and, alike sensible that no time was to be lost in detaching their brother, we shortly resolved on joining him directly in London.
The word wind, in this passage, suggested to the minds of some, who afterwards gave an account of this meeting, a coincidence which might, in the spirit of the times, be construed into a special appointment of Providence.
These are interpreted by the superstitious Indians into warnings that strangers are at hand; and one accidental coincidence, like the chance fulfillment of an almanac prediction, is sufficient to cover a thousand failures.
I lay all night where I had fallen and the next morning brought an explanation of the fortunate coincidence that had saved me from a terrible death.
Was it, indeed, a coincidence that Lucas should meet his death on the night when the letter disappeared.
All this is only the coincidence of conditions in which all vital organic and elemental events occur.
To Uriel watching the progress of planetary history from the sun, the one result would be just as much of a coincidence as the other.
And yet it may have been pure coincidence; my better judgment tells me that it is coincidence that in Caspak the term for speechless man is Alus, and in the outer world of our own day it is Alalus.
It was an odd coincidence, to say the least of it, that the march of events should be unexpectedly taking Agnes to Venice, after those words had been spoken