Commerce

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Commerce

The exchange of goods, products, or any type of Personal Property. Trade and traffic carried on between different peoples or states and its inhabitants, including not only the purchase, sale, and exchange of commodities but also the instrumentalities, agencies, and means by which business is accomplished. The transportation of persons and goods, by air, land, and sea. The exchange of merchandise on a large scale between different places or communities.

Although the terms commerce and trade are often used interchangeably, commerce refers to large-scale business activity, while trade describes commercial traffic within a state or a community.

BILLS PAYABLE, COMMERCE. Engagements which a merchant has entered into in writing, and which he is to pay on their becoming due. Pard. n. 85.

COMMERCE, trade, contracts. The exchange of commodities for commodities; considered in a legal point of view, it consists in the various agreements which have for their object to facilitate the exchange of the products of the earth or industry of man, with an intent to realize a profit. Pard. Dr. Coin. n. 1. In a narrower sense, commerce signifies any reciprocal agreements between two persons, by which one delivers to the other a thing, which the latter accepts, and for which he pays a consideration; if the consideration be money, it is called a sale; if any other thing than money, it is called exchange or barter. Domat, Dr. Pub. liv. 1, tit. 7, s. 1, n. 2. Congress have power by the constitution to regulate commerce with foreign nations and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes. 1 Kent. 431; Story on Const. Sec. 1052, et seq. The sense in which the word commerce is used in the constitution seems not only to include traffic, but intercourse and navigation. Story, Sec. 1057; 9 Wheat. 190, 191, 215, 229; 1 Tuck. Bl. App. 249 to 252. Vide 17 John. R. 488; 4 John. Ch. R. 150; 6 John. Ch. R. 300; 1 Halst. R. 285; Id. 236; 3 Cowen R. 713; 12 Wheat. R. 419; 1 Brock. R. 423; 11 Pet. R. 102; 6 Cowen, R. 169; 3 Dana, R. 274; 6 Pet. R. 515; 13 S. & R. 205.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the email Barker said he'd left Commercial Development four weeks prior to sending the message.
However, the 40 acres are designated for commercial development, and the family hopes the land will be zoned for commercial use, Kloos said.
Contact, Tate & Lyle Innovation & Commercial Development on tel 020 7257 2277 or visit www.tateandlyleopeninnovation.com
The majority of that space, 791,000 sq ft, will come from four key commercial developments in Snow Hill, Colmore Plaza, 45 Church Street and Eleven Brindleyplace, while smaller mixed use developments at Derwent Foundry, Ansty Court and St Paul's Place will bring 36,000 sq ft to the market on a "for sale" basis.
This community of 6,500 experienced a three-per-cent population dip from 1996, but that dire statistic hasn't deterred some new residential and commercial developments from springing up.
But James Marshall, of Commercial Development Projects, said today the company was still weighing up its options.
Filtrona Fibertec has named Jeff Shugart as executive vice president for commercial development to lead the company's growth globally.
The 50 to 60 condominiums constructed u411 sell for $500,000 and up, while the hotel will be a full-service Hilton Hotel with 240 to 300 rooms, says Bruce Watts, senior commercial development manager for the city of Norfolk.
In December 2004, HTRG sold the development rights of 90,000 acres of the Snoqualmie Forest, located on the Puget Sound in King County, to the county, thus eliminating any threat of residential or commercial development on this land.
Through the joint venture, the two companies will pursue technical, operational and commercial development of aluminum foam components for automotive applications in Europe and China.
It turns out that federal regulations are stronger than gravity in holding back the commercial development of space launches.
The Commercial Development and Marketing Association (CDMA) and the Chemical Heritage Foundation will present the 2004 Award for Executive Excellence to Madeleine Jacobs, executive director and CEO of the American Chemical Society.

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