concubinage

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concubinage

an old-fashioned word for COHABITATION.

CONCUBINAGE. This term has two different significations; sometimes it means a species of marriage which took place among the ancients, and which is yet in use in some countries. In this country it means the act or practice of cohabiting as man and woman, in sexual commerce, without the authority of law, or a legal marriage. Vide 1 Bro. Civ. Law, 80; Merl. Rep. b. t.; Dig. 32, 49, 4; Id. 7, 1, 1; Code, 5, 27, 12.

References in periodicals archive ?
(104) Le Tribunal d'instance de Paris 4e, dans un jugement du 5 aout 1993, avait considere que le trans fert du bail etait possible car <<le legislateur designe en toute neutralite et generalite le concubin notoire sans autre precision que celle liee a la stabilite de l'union.
Bien que les Pays-Bas aient reconnu avant la Suede la qualite de concubins pour les partenaires homosexuels stables, cette reconnaissance ne provenait pas de la loi mais d'une creation jurisprudentielle.
L'adoption peut etre demandee par des couples maries ou par des celibataires, mais non par des concubins. Il semble, a premiere vue, contradictoire de vouloir instituer une filiation sociale completement calquee sur un modele biologique -- l'enfant est dit ne de ses parents adoptifs -- et de permettre en meme temps l'adoption a une personne seule, tout en l'interdisant aux concubins.
At one level Lodowicke points the orthodox patriarchal moral which almost every writer who deals with Shore's wife adopts: her fall illustrates 'the shamefull end of a Kings concubin' - as a loose woman, she has had this 'end' coming for some time.
I begin with Lodowicke because he exhibits in dramatic form the availability of 'Shores Wife' to Elizabethan writers as a sexually and politically loaded subject.(2) As a woman of humble origins about whom little was known other than that she was - crucially - 'a Kings concubin', she constituted (to borrow a metaphor from Drayton's Rosamond) a sexualized 'scribled paper' which Elizabethan writers reinscribed at will.(3) In this article I examine this process of inscription through three texts - More's Richard III, Churchyard's Shores Wife, and Heywood's Edward IV.