consanguinity

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Related to Consanguineal: affinal, Consanguineal family

Consanguinity

Blood relationship; the relation of people who descend from the same ancestor.

Consanguinity is the basis of the laws that govern such matters as rules of Descent and Distribution of property, the degree of relation between which marriage is prohibited under the laws concerning Incest, and a basis for the determination of who may serve as a witness.

Lineal consanguinity is the relation in a direct line—such as between parent, child, and grandparent. It may be determined either upward—as in the case of son, father, grandfather—or downward—as in son, grandson, great-grandson.

Collateral consanguinity is a more remote relationship describing people who are related by a common ancestor but do not descend from each other—such as cousins who have the same grandparents.

Consanguinity is not the same as affinity, which is a close relation based on marriage rather than on common ancestry.

See: affiliation, affinity, ancestry, association, blood, bloodline, connection, contact, degree, family, kinship, propinquity, relation, relationship

consanguinity

the relationship of persons descended from the same ancestor. Thus sons are consanguine with their fathers, brothers with each other. See AFFINITY.

CONSANGUINITY. The relation subsisting among all the different persons descending from the same stock, or common ancestor. Vaughan, 322, 329; 2 Bl. Com. 202 Toull. Dr. Civ.. Fr. liv. 3, t. 1, ch. n 115 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1955, et seq.
     2. Some portion of the blood of the common ancestor flows through the veins of all his descendants, and though mixed with the blood flowing from many other families, yet it constitutes the kindred or alliance by blood between any two of the individuals. This relation by blood is of two kinds, lineal and collateral.
     3. Lineal consanguinity is that relation which exists among persons, where one is descended from the other, as between the son and the father, or the grandfather, and so upwards in a direct ascending line; and between the father and the son, or the grandson, and so downwards in a direct descending line. Every generation in this direct course males a degree, computing either in the ascending or descending line. This being the natural mode of computing the degrees of lineal, consanguinity, it has been adopted by the civil, the canon, and the common law.
     4. Collateral consanguinity is the relation subsisting among persons who descend from the same common ancestor, but not from each other. It is essential to constitute this relation, that they spring from the same common root or stock, but in different branches. The mode of computing the degrees is to discover the common ancestor, to begin with him to reckon downwards, and the degree the two persons, or the more remote of them, is distant from the ancestor, is the degree of kindred subsisting between them. For instance, two brothers are related to each other in the first degree, because from the father to each of them is one degree. An uncle and a nephew are related to each other in tho second degree, because the nephew is two degrees distant from the common ancestor, and the rule of computation is extended to the remotest degrees of collateral relationship. This is the mode of computation by the common and canon law. The method of computing by the civil law, is to begin at either of the persons in question and count up to the common ancestor, and then downwards to the, other person, calling it a degree for each person, both ascending and descending, and the degrees they stand from each other is the degree in which they stand related. Thus, from a nephew to his father, is one degree; to the grandfather, two degrees and then to the uncle, three; which points out the relationship.
     5. The following table, in which the Roman numeral letters express the degrees by the civil law, and those in Arabic figures at the bottom, those by the common law, will fully illustrate the subject.

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
³          IV.       ³
³Great grand-father's³
³        father      ³
³           4        ³
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ III. ³ ³ V. ³ ³ Great grand-father ³ ³Great grand-uncle³ ³ 3. ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ \ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ II. ³ ³ IV. ³ ³ Grand father ³ ³ Great uncle. ³ ³ 2. ³ ³ 3 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ \ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ I. ³ ³ III. ³ ³ V. ³ ³ ³ ³ Father ³ ³ Uncle. ³ ³Great Uncle's son³ ³ 1. ³ ³ 2. ³ ³ 3. ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ \ \ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ ³ ³ II. ³ ³ IV. ³ ³ VI. ³ ³Intestate person ³ ³ Brother ³ ³ Cousin german ³ ³ 2nd. Cousin³ ³ proposed. ³ ³ 1 ³ ³ 2 ³ ³ 3 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄ¿ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ I. ³ ³ III. ³ ³ V. ³ ³ Son. ³ ³ Nephew ³ ³Son of Cousin³ ³ 1. ³ ³ 2 ³ ³ german 3 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÙÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ II. ³ ³ IV. ³ ³ Grandson. ³ ³Son of Nephew or ³ ³ 2. ³ ³brother's grandson³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ³ 3 ³
     ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ III. ³ ³ Great grandson. ³ ³ 3. ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ



     6. The mode of the civil law is preferable, for it points out the actual degree of kindred in all cases; by the mode adopted by the common law, different relations may stand in the same degree. The uncle and nephew stand related in the second degree by the common law, and so are two first cousins, or two sons of two brothers; but by the civil law the uncle and nephew are in the third degree, and the cousins are in the fourth. The mode of computation, however, is immaterial, for both will establish the same person to be the heir. 2 Bl. Com. 202; 1 Swift's Dig. 113; Toull. Civ. Fr. liv. 8, t. 1, o. 3, n. 115. Vide Branch; Degree; Line.

References in periodicals archive ?
49) Many families have their own kinship or kindred network that includes consanguineal as well as affinal relatives.
Why they did not specify their actual ties may be explained by what I term elective kinship, a process whereby owners of color could choose whether or not to specify in legal documents their spousal or consanguineal ties to their human property.
Female, mother- centered consanguineal ties are strengthened relative to the conjugal bond , providing childrearing and material support among women, although men may also be providers even when not living with their children's mother, as well as in their roles as sons or brothers (See essays in Momsen, 1993; Barrow, 1999, 1996; Mohammed, 1999; Rowley, 2002).
He concludes that kinship (even when based on "nature") is socially constructed rather than simply consanguineal.
Perry's argument reveals the usefulness of correctly read literary evidence, especially in answering questions which traditional historical sources do not address (as in the case of the shifting importance of consanguineal relationships, which she analyzes) (164).
In this system matrilineal relatives are deemed consanguineal, while patrilineal relatives are not viewed as members of the individual's clan.
When paternity cannot be established, or, if established, is unacknowledged by the father, certain Islamic countries either resort to the use of a surname invented by government officials, as if the offspring were a foundling child,(72) or permit the mother to choose freely the surname of one of her consanguineal kin, or her own surname.
On the return of Hildeburh to Denmark, Hill hypothesizes: 'The poet does not say so but she may now feel some relief as her consanguineal affections and legal worth remain with her father's family' (my italics); all has now ended 'in a just settlement, if not altogether happily'.
Compadrazgo (co-parenting) ties supplement consanguineal bonds, and on a day-to-day basis one often interacts with comadres rather than "blood relatives" who live dispersed across villages, neighborhoods and regions.
To obtain a copy of these files one must demonstrate consanguineal links if the person is deceased or obtain written permission from the living relative concerned.
But even before the Duranos and their kin, the Almendrases, rose from relative obscurity in the 20th century, notably after World War II, the Dutertes were already of the Buena Sociedad Cebuana, Cebu's multi-ethnic high society-and connected to it by consanguineal and affinal ties going back to the 18th century.