conscience clause

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conscience clause

a clause in a law or contract exempting persons with moral scruples. See e.g. ABORTION.
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Under all but a few conscience clauses, care may be refused even in emergency situations.
Built-in conscience clauses allow pharmacists to opt-out of provision on moral or religious grounds, providing they refer patients to other providers willing to prescribe the product.
Conscience clauses explicitly protect this interest.
at 527-37 (conscience clauses not protected by Free Exercise, but those that impose significant burdens violate the Establishment and Due Process clauses); Martha S.
In a letter last September reacting to the proposed Bush rule, the Catholic Health Association said it had "long supported and worked for the enactment of conscience clause protections" in federal laws such as the Church Amendments, the Public Health Service Act and the Weldon Amendment.
For up-to-date information on conscience clauses check NCSL's Web page at www.ncsl.org/programs/health/conscienceclauses.htm
"If a pharmacy is going to be in a business of stocking and dispensing contraceptives, it shouldn't make judgments about who should or should not have access to those contraceptives," says a Blagojevich spokeswoman, adding the governor does not believe that pharmacists are covered by conscience clauses.
Izzotti welcomes the precedent set, but he believes that as with most "conscience clauses" (notably that in Saskatchewan), this agreement continues to violate the conscience rights of pro-life pharmacists by making them ensure, even as they "step back", that the customer continues to be provided with the objectionable service (Lifesite News, Nov 4/03).
Reproductive choices are already limited in Peru, with conscience clauses allowing physicians to opt out of giving care they deem offensive, including emergency contraception and post-abortion care.
Place, president and chief executive officer for the Catholic Health Association of the United States, disagreed that a new interpretation of religious "conscience clauses" is necessary or warranted.