consensus

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Religion in the United States sustains the most important organizations that emphasize the role of values in social life; and as long as they must compete, the rise of consensus politics will intensify, not diminish, that competition, as religious sects will have to offer incentives to attract the many who are influenced by the empiricism all around them.
We have been assured by the Labour group that it believes in consensus politics.
Stressing the importance of dynamic bargaining in addressing social and political problems, Lesbirel shows the role of these compromises in Japanese consensus politics.
But the consensus politics of the Left are politics of big govern-ment, of higher taxation, of the nanny state.
It was the breakdown of consensus politics that led the party to abandon suffrage as the central focus of its political agenda; and the decline in the party's commitment accounted, in part, for the eventual disfranchisement of southern blacks.
Good times and consensus politics also have thrown the Republican Congressional leadership off balance.
A 1993 survey that found 44% of Canadians feeling positive about Parliament, found only 23% of Germans, where consensus politics is common, feeling the same way.
This attitude seems to have paid lip-service to consensus politics and to have given vent to permanent tension.
The primary weakness of Teles's thesis is its failure to distinguish between dissensus and consensus politics, and perhaps normal politics, on conceptual and historical levels.
But he is pr-aised essentially for bringing the left into the fold, for merging France into the Western world and its pattern of consensus politics.
The advent of Mrs Thatcher's government in 1979 was widely seen as destroying the consensus politics established in the immediate post-war period, urging instead a limited role for the state, a greater emphasis on markets and enterprise, a reduced role for the unions and new models of delivery for health and education.
This is the brand of consensus stressed by Kavanagh and by his co-author of Consensus Politics, Peter Morris.