chain gang

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chain gang

(US) a group of convicted prisoners chained together, usually while doing hard labour.
References in periodicals archive ?
has made a contract whereby a portion of the convict labor at Stillwater will be employed by them.
the Chicago Syndicate, that free men will not submit to the introduction of slavery into our trade under the guise of contract convict labor, and that you will not teach our trade to convicts to enrich these schemers, who care for nothing hut the almighty dollar and now seek to degrade our trade to fill their pockets.
But those Saturday therapy sessions are threatened by a lawsuit filed last month by a neighbor, who claims the ranch is operating without proper permits and relies on convict labor to maintain the property.
The Colonel's nemesis, Bill Fetters, has a firm hold on the convict labor contracts created by this new middle class to control the freed slaves.
The Walsh-Healy Act of 1936 "banned convict labor on federal procurement contracts in the manufacturing, production, or furnishing of any materials, supplies, articles or equipment used in government contracts where the amount thereof exceeds $10,000.
Merely witnessing Loomis's suffering is sufficient to recognize the compelling symbolic presence of the white man on stage: "He represents the evil that takes away all the potential identified with black men, whether that evil historically took the form of slavery, sharecropping, or convict labor as a result of being jailed without any semblance of due process" (Harris 56).
and other share holders are asking Wal-Mart's board of directors to prepare a document stating that the company won't purchase goods from suppliers who "manufacture items using forced labor, convict labor or child labor, or who fail to comply with fundamental workplace rights .
Convicted criminals often faced corporal punishments but usually were sentenced to convict labor as well.
It is also true, however, that care must be exercised to avoid either the exploitation of convict labor or any unfair competition between convict labor and free labor in the production of goods and services.
Convict labor became increasingly racialized: it was assumed that blacks were more suitable for hard physical labor on Southern prison farms and on corporate railroad and construction company projects (Lichtenstein, 1996b).
Nevertheless, the Rhode Island General Assembly had passed legislation allowing the use of convict labor.
The more conspiratorially minded note the growth of private prisons and convict labor, and suspect the profit motives of the "prison-industrial complex.