conviction

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Conviction

The outcome of a criminal prosecution which concludes in a judgment that the defendant is guilty of the crime charged. The juncture of a criminal proceeding during which the question of guilt is ascertained. In a case where the perpetrator has been adjudged guilty and sentenced, a record of the summary proceedings brought pursuant to any penal statute before one or more justices of the peace or other properly authorized persons.

The terms conviction and convicted refer to the final judgment on a verdict of guilty, a plea of guilty, or a plea of nolo contendere. They do not include a final judgment that has been deleted by a pardon, set aside, reversed, or otherwise rendered inoperative.

The term summary conviction refers to the consequence of a trial before a court or magistrate, without a jury, which generally involves a minor misdemeanor.

conviction

n. the result of a criminal trial in which the defendant has been found guilty of a crime.

conviction

(Finding of guilt), noun adjudgment, aspersion, avengement, blame, censure, charge, condemnation, criminality, culpability, damnatio, damnation, decision, decree, decrial, denouncement, denunciation, exaction of penalty, execution of sentence, final condemnation, finding, hostile verdict, imposition, judgment, passing judgment, penalization, penalty, prescribed punishhent, proof of guilt, punishment, punition, reprehension, reprisal, reprobation, reproof, retribution, retributive justice, ruling, sentence, sentencing, unfavorable verdict, verdict
Associated concepts: certificate of conviction, criminal conniction, felony conviction, final conviction, guilty verdict, nolo cotendere plea, record of conviction, sentencing

conviction

(Persuasion), noun ascertained principle, assumption, assurance, assured belief, attitude, avowal, certitude, concept, conception, conclusion, credence, creed, declaration of faith, doctrine, dogma, faith, firm belief, fixed opinion, impression, judgment, leaning, mind, opinio, opinion, outlook, personal judgment, point of view, position, positiveness, postulation, posture, predilection, predisposition, presupposition, principle, proclivity, profession, propensity, rooted belief, sententia, sentiment, settled belief, settled judgment, standpoint, staunch belief, supposition, sureness, tenet, thinking, understanding, unshakable opinion, view, viewpoint, way of thinking, well-founded opinion
See also: belief, certainty, certification, certitude, condemnation, confidence, credence, determination, dogma, faith, idea, notion, opinion, principle, punishment, reliance, sentence, standpoint, surety, trust

conviction

a person is convicted of an offence if he pleads or is found guilty of that offence.

CONVICTION, practice. A condemnation. In its most extensive sense this word signifies the giving judgment against a defendant, whether criminal or civil. In a more limited sense, it means, the judgment given against the criminal. And in its most restricted sense it is a record of the summary proceedings upon any penal statute before one or more justices of the peace, or other persons duly authorized, in a case where the offender has been convicted and sentenced: this last is usually termed a summary conviction.
     2. As summary. convictions have been introduced in derogation of the common law, and operate to the exclusion of trial by jury, the courts have required that the strict letter of the statute should be observed 1 Burr. Rep. 613 and that the magistrates should have been guided by rules similar to those adopted by the common law, in criminal prosecution, and founded in natural justice; unless when the statute dispenses with the form of stating them.
     3. The general rules in relation to convictions are, first, it must be under the hand and seal of the magistrate before whom it is taken; secondly, it must be in the present tense, but this, perhaps, ought to extend only to the judgment; thirdly, it must be certain; fourthly, although it is well to lay the offence to be contra pacem, this is not indispensable; fifthly, a conviction cannot be good in part and bad in part.
     4. A conviction usually consists of six parts; first, the information; which should contain, 1. The day when it was taken. 2. The place where it was taken. 3. The name of the informer. 4. The name and style of the justice or justices to whom it was given. 5. The name of the offender. 6. The time of committing the offence. 7. The place where the offence was committed. 8. An exact description of the offence.
     5. Secondly, the summons.
     6. Thirdly, the appearance or non-appearance of the defendant.
     7. Fourthly, his defence or confessions.
     8. Fifthly, the evidence. Dougl. 469; 2 Burr. 1163; 4 Burr. 2064.
     9. Sixthly, the judgment or adjudication, which should state, 1. That the defendant is convicted. 2. The forfeiture or penalty. Vide Bosc. on Conviction; Espinasse on Penal Actions; 4 Dall. 266; 3 Yeates, 475; 1 Yeates, 471. As to the effect of a conviction as evidence in a civil case, see 1 Phil. Ev. 259; 8 Bouv. Inst. 3183.

References in classic literature ?
"Sometimes, thinking over this, I became quite numb with the terror of it; and I might well have deduced from this fact, that my 'last conviction' was eating into my being too fast and too seriously, and would undoubtedly come to its climax before long.
"I hinted nothing to him about my 'final conviction,' but it appeared to me that he had guessed it from my words.
"I have been more pained," said she, "by her endeavors to acquit him than by all the rest; for it irritates her mind more than the most perfect conviction of his unworthiness can do.
"Well, Ned, I repeat it with a conviction resting on the logic of facts.
Rather the pivotal issue was whether the convictions awarded to Nasir Mehmood would be taken as a whole in a cumulative manner, the effect whereof would be a conviction, followed by a sentence on four counts for an aggregate period of six years in terms of the provisions of PLGA.
973.155 (2017-18), for the initial confinement time that he served on two convictions that were each vacated while Harrison was then serving the initial confinement portion of the sentence on each respective vacated conviction.
KILLER Carlton Donaldson was already well-known to the authorities, with a catalogue of criminal convictions.
Spurred by difficulties vacating convictions from prosecutions that involved officers from the former Gun Trace Task Force, agroup of prosecutors and criminal justice reform advocates are supporting legislation tocreate a new mechanism in the law.
924(e) because certain prior convictions were no longer valid predicate offenses for the purposes of ACCA.
North Wales Police and Crime Commissioner Arfon Jones said recruiting people with convictions can have a positive impact on their businesses by giving them access to a new talent pool.
Accordingly, the question is whether all convictions for violating Code 18.2-57.2 involve "the use or attempted use of physical force" as that phrase is used in 18 U.S.C.