Coin

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COIN, commerce, contracts. A piece of gold, silver or other metal stamped by authority of the government, in order to determine its value, commonly called money. Co. Litt. 207; Rutherf. Inst. 123. For the different kinds of coins of the United States, see article Money. As to the value of foreign coins, see article Foreign Coins.

References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: 3-9 Examples of Shaiva, Vaishnava, Middle Iranian and Islamic iconography on native Sakra copper coins. (3) Eight-spoked chakra, 13.2 x 11.9 mm / 0.55 g.
"While we've had to disappoint some people by telling them their bags of copper coins aren't worth much, it's great when the occasional customer brings in something more unusual."
The sources said that ISIL's financial department has issued a new directive based on which residents of Raqqa and Deir Ezzur are committed to trade only in gold, silver and copper coins and are not allowed to change them into any currency.
The four copper coins, and one believed to be from the Ottoman Empire, were displayed at a museum in Uruma.
What you need: A saucer, vinegar, salt, copper coins (pre-1982 pennies), paper towels Steps: 1.
At the fort's base, Islamic copper coins that date back to the beginning of the Umayyad era were also found.
With his partnership with Watt, Boulton himself became an engineer of no mean competence in making scientific tests of steam engines and machinery for the mechanical reproduction of fine-art pictures, and he went on to found the Soho Mint, the first steam-powered coining operation in the world that produced millions of copper coins for the Royal Mint.
Inserting copper coins, which subjects through-holes to loads, was previously considered difficult for multi-layer boards.
He said that during the last season of the excavation, a good no of antiquities such as, a bust of Buddha Sculpture in stucco, copper coins, bones, charcoal, Iron objects and pottery have been discovered.
Exemplified by ChinaAEs copper coins or otrue money,o copper was the currency of the man in the street, notwithstanding the Qing dynastyAEs system of bimetallism.
Fool's gold: The economic stupidity of ISIS' new currency Believe it or not, there is a good reason the developed world long ago ceased to use lumps of precious metals as currency, and, contrary to the beliefs of the ISIS leadership, it was not in order to "tyrannize Muslims." In declaring his intention to introduce a brand new currency comprising seven gold, silver, and copper coins, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi builds on an already-staggering commitment to his pre-mediaeval ideology, reminding us anew of the utterly alien parallel universe in which he and his coterie reside.